2017 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report and Drug-Free Schools Act Information

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September 21, 2017

Policy on Reporting the Annual Disclosure of Crime Statistics

The safety and well-being of all members of our community is of great concern to the University of Washington Tacoma. Many departments and employees are dedicated to making the campus a safer place to live and work. A safe environment depends on the cooperation and involvement of individuals in safeguarding themselves and others. We encourage all members of the University of Washington Tacoma community to use this report as a guide for safe practices on and off campus.

Campus Safety and Security prepares this report to comply with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act. Campus Safety and Security work with university offices and public agencies, such as the Office of Student and Enrollment Services, and Tacoma Police Department (TPD), to compile the information. Each entity provides updated information on their educational efforts and programs to comply with the act. Campus crime, arrest, and referral statistics include those reported to Campus Safety and Security, designated campus officials (including but not limited to directors, department heads, designated advisors to students and student organizations), and local law enforcement agencies.

This publication contains information to aid in the cooperative effort of keeping the campus safe. It contains specific information on safety and security, crime prevention, patrol operations and breadth of authority, policies relating to reporting crime, campus disciplinary procedures, and crime statistics reported from 2014, 2015, and 2016. These statistics reflect reported crimes that occurred on campus and buildings or property owned or controlled by University of Washington Tacoma, and on public property that is immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus.

This publication is posted on University of Washington Tacoma’s website by October 1 each year. We notify all students, staff, and faculty via email.  You can obtain this report online at the following web address: www.tacoma.uw.edu/security.  All current or prospective faculty, staff, and students can also obtain a paper copy by writing to:

Annual Security Report Request
Campus Safety and Security
University of Washington Tacoma
1900 Commerce Street
Tacoma, WA 98402-3100

Additional security information, crime prevention programs, and crime statistics are also available by contacting Campus Safety and Security.

 

Contents

Message from the Director............................................................................................. 4

Campus Safety and Security Organization.......................................................................... 5

Crime Prevention and Security Awareness Programs............................................................ 7

Available Crime Information.......................................................................................... 10

Reporting for Criminal Actions and Emergencies................................................................. 12

UW Sexual Assault Policies, Prevention and Response..................................................... 13-25

Access to Campus Facilities........................................................................................... 26

University Alcohol and Drug Policy.................................................................................. 28

Local and Federal Laws............................................................................................ 33-37

2014, 2015 and 2016 Crime and Fire Statistic

                  Criminal Offenses........................................................................................... 38

                  Hate Crime Offenses....................................................................................... 39

                  Crimes that Resulted in an Arrest or Referral for Disciplinary Action............................. 40

               Fire Statistics Report for Student Housing…………………………………………………………….40

                  Campus Map................................................................................................. 41

 

Message from the Director

On behalf of the men and women of UW Tacoma Campus Safety and Security, I would like to welcome you to the University of Washington Tacoma campus. University of Washington Tacoma is a growing community of over 5,000 students, faculty and staff working and studying on a beautiful campus in an urban setting. Living and working in a tranquil environment such as University of Washington Tacoma can cause us to forget that crime and other problems can plague us, just as they do communities outside the boundaries of the university.

The following information has been prepared to increase awareness of the current programs that exist to protect your safety and well-being. Portions are also provided in compliance with laws of the State of Washington (RCW 28B.10.569), The Federal Safe and Drug–Free Schools and Communities Act (20 USC 1145g) and the Higher Education Opportunity Act (Title 20 U.S. Code Section 1092 Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics), also known as the Jeanne Clery Act.

Please join us in keeping informed and prepared by reading this report and referring to it often.

Thank you,

Susan Wagshul-Golden
Director of Campus Safety and Security

 

Campus Safety and Security Department Organization

Campus Safety and Security Department are a team of men and women committed to ensuring the safety and security of the University of Washington Tacoma campus community. We are comprised of a Director, Program Coordinator, two Campus Security Sergeants, and eleven Campus Security Officers. We all strive to conduct ourselves with the highest standards of professionalism, ethical behavior, and pride in all we do. Many of our staff are trained and certified as instructors for our educational programs.

We operate 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and 365 days a year to provide a safe and secure educational environment for the University. We work with liaisons with our local emergency responders such as Tacoma Fire Department, Tacoma Police Department and Pierce County Emergency Management. Our department’s non-emergency number is 253-692-4416 or office is located in the Dougan Building, suite 180.

Police Authority: University of Washington Tacoma’s Campus Security officers are not commissioned law enforcement officers of the state of Washington and as such have no arrest authority. Campus Security officers are obligated as representatives of the University of Washington Tacoma to enforce university rules and regulations. Campus Security officers are permitted to detain individuals suspected of criminal activity and to request their name and destination. However, since we do not have arrest authority we work closely with the Tacoma Police Department who does, and routinely responds when their presence is requested. They determine if an arrest is to be made. Officers must be mindful of their safety while performing their duties. For this reason, and based on articulable suspicion of a potential threat, the law permits Campus Security officers to search a person who has been detained to ensure he or she does not possess a weapon.

Emergency Response: In a campus-wide emergency, Campus Safety and Security will work in concert with the campus Evacuation Wardens (EW) to provide a coordinated and effective response to the university community. Please click the link for more information on Emergency Evacuation Operation Plan 2017 for our campus (www.tacoma.uw.edu/sites/default/files/sections/CampusSafety/UwtEeopJuly2017.pdf). We encourage all users to access this site for information and to sign up for UW Alert (http://www.tacoma.uw.edu/updates). When an emergency occurs, these texts alert will notify the campus community of the nature of the emergency. Because we can send the alerts to any cell phone or e-mail address regardless of physical location, students find them an invaluable resource for keeping informed if an emergency occurs on campus.

Officer Training: UW Tacoma Campus Security officers have a broad expanse of training and certifications but all officers annually attend a variety of training regimens to maintain the skills necessary. These comprehensive programs provide valuable training in all aspects of university safety. Campus Security officers must successfully complete certification or recertification in skills training, such as CPR and first aid. UW Tacoma Campus Security officers also take other training, such as defensive tactics, use of force, ethics, Title IX compliance, sexual harassment prevention and emergency management response.

Fire Alarm Systems and Crime Prevention Services

The security, fire, supervisory and trouble alarms are monitored by third party vendor but are university maintained. The access control card readers are monitored by Campus Safety and Security department. Campus Safety and Security personnel work closely with Facilities Services and many other departments on campus to identify and promptly repair any malfunctioning security devices.

Relationship with Local Law Enforcement Agencies

University of Washington Tacoma is located in the upper northeast part of Tacoma, Washington, in sector 1 of the Tacoma Police Department (TPD). Campus Safety and Security maintains a close working relationship with TPD and communicates items of mutual concern on a daily basis with them. TPD dispatches officers when a crime is reported, when a Campus Safety Officer requests them, or when an arrest may be made. TPD works with Campus Safety officers on all levels of crimes. The UW Tacoma Campus Safety Director meets with TPD officials about campus issues to discuss mutual concerns, coordinate programs, and exchange information.

Off-Campus Criminal Activity

Campus Safety and Security does not provide services for off-campus criminal activity involving students. Off-campus criminal activity is handled through Tacoma Police Department and will be redirected to the appropriate law enforcement agency. A student involved in off-campus criminal conduct may also be referred to Judicial Affairs and Mediation Services to face Conduct Council charges for violations of the Conduct Code. University of Washington Tacoma’s Campus Safety and Security Director coordinates with contacts on city, county, state and national levels on a frequent basis to receive follow-up reports on criminal activities that may affect the University. Campus Safety and Security maintains a comprehensive crime prevention program. Working with other University departments, the crime prevention coordinator develops and monitors procedures and programs to promote safety and security. While it is the responsibility of each member of Campus Safety and Security to promote crime prevention throughout the university community, the coordinator is responsible for implementing Campus Safety and Security’s proactive stance on crime prevention as part of its basic philosophy. This includes, but is not limited to, conducting programs, answering questions about safety and security, responding to inquiries about Campus Safety and Security’s role on campus, and encouraging residents to become actively safety conscious.

To help students and employees protect themselves and their property, this unit develops and makes available to the University community a variety of educational programs and materials.

Crime Prevention and Security Awareness Programs

Campus Safety and Security presents the following programs to all faculty, staff, and students. They address specific needs of the audience and focus on individuals taking personal responsibility for their safety, avoiding unsafe situations, and using Campus Safety and Security services. The sessions (unless otherwise noted) vary in length.

  • Crime Prevention Awareness: Educates students about living in an urban setting and using crime prevention skills. This typically is customized for the specific audience.
  • Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) survey: A multi-disciplinary approach to deterring criminal behavior through environmental design. CPTED strategies rely upon the ability to influence offender decisions that precede criminal acts by affecting the built, social and administrative environment. It is pronounced sep-ted and is known by various labels or names around the world, such as Designing Out Crime and other acronyms.
  • Rape Aggression Defense (RAD) Systems for Women: Teaches women about rape prevention and practical physical self-defense techniques (offered annually).
  • Resist Aggression with Defense (RAD) for Men: The program’s primary focus is the realistic development of basic self-defense options for men, before and during imminent or actual assault.
  • Safe Campus: Provides students, faculty, and staff with safety tips and tools for use to prevent violence on and around campus. Encourages a proactive method to prevent violence in the workplace and on campus. Tells how to avoid becoming a victim and how to enhance safety during unexpected emergencies. Participants learn:
    • 1) The warning signs of violence
    • 2) About Safe Campus - what it is and how to use its resources
    • 3) How to respond in potentially violent situations
    • 4) What campus resources are available to assist those affected by violence
  • Sexual Assault Awareness: Educates individuals, primarily women, on acquaintance rape and preventive strategies to avoid dangerous dating situations. It also educates students on forms of dating violence, such as emotional and sexual abuse.
  • Emergency Preparedness and Response training: Provides students, faculty and staff with tools on how to prepare for an emergency or disaster and to respond. For more information go to this link: https://www.tacoma.uw.edu/campus-safety/emergency-response

Campus groups who sponsor these programs increase attendance and bring together individuals who have common concerns. Any interested group should contact Campus Safety and Security at 253-692-4416. The Office of Student Success may offer related programs on acquaintance rape, alcohol, relationships and self-defense.

Walking Security Safety Escort Service

For your safety, UW Tacoma encourages students, faculty, staff, and visitors to use the Safety Escort Program. Campus Security Officers are available to walk with you to your car or other campus destinations 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

The service is free of charge. During busy periods, the Campus Security Officer may ask you to meet in a common location to facilitate escorting multiple people. Dial 253-692-4416 to request a Safety Escort.

Campus Safety Officers do not provide safety escorts beyond the UW Tacoma campus boundaries (between S. 17th and S. 21st Streets and Pacific and Tacoma Avenues). If you have parked at the Tacoma Dome Station garage, officers can walk with you to the Link light-rail train, but cannot ride with you to the garage. If you need a security officer to walk with you off campus we can contact BIA security officers to meet you on campus and escort you to your car within the downtown core between Tacoma Ave. and Dock St., S.25th St. and S. 4th St.

Weapons Policy

The possession or use of firearms, explosives, dangerous chemicals or other dangerous weapons or instrumentalities on the University campus, except for authorized University purposes, is prohibited by Washington Administrative Code WAC478-124-020- Conduct on Campus http://apps.leg.wa.gov/WAC/default.aspx?cite=478-124-020. This does not include pepper spray.

Written approval is required by the Chancellor prior to accessing University property with the prohibited items listed above. For more information contact the Director of Campus Safety and Security at 253-692-4425 or visit online:  http://www.tacoma.uw.edu/node/22394

Violation of this policy by students, faculty, staff or visitors to the Tacoma campus may be subject to disciplinary actions and/or civil or criminal citation.

Crime Prevention Tips

  • Program the Campus Safety and Security emergency number (253-692-4416) or 911 into your cell phone.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Travel in groups at night whenever possible, especially when walking.
  • Use lighted walkways and thoroughfares, even if it means going out of your way.
  • Walk briskly, with your head up, and with assurance. Do not walk in brush-covered areas or against buildings.
  • Do not wear dangling jewelry when traveling into the city. Keep purses, backpacks, and money belts close to the body, and do not leave them unattended.
  • Do not struggle if someone attempts to take your property.

Student participating in the Housing Program

  • Attend crime prevention seminars held on campus. Campus Safety and Security and other programs sponsor seminars on a variety of subjects that could help students avoid becoming victims of crime.
  • Always lock your room door at all times, whether the room is occupied or not, e.g., while you are sleeping.
  • Report doors propped open—they increase vulnerability to crime. If you find an interior or exterior dorm door propped open, call a resident assistant and close the door.
  • Lock cash, credit cards, jewelry, and other valuables in a drawer and take these valuables with you during school breaks. Be careful not to leave clothing and other property unattended.

Safety When Coming and Going to campus

  • Lock your bicycle with a high-security lock.
  • Park your vehicle in a well-lit and populated area. If this is impossible, scan the area before getting into or out of your vehicle. Know your surroundings!
  • Get into your vehicle briskly, quickly, and confidently.
  • Avoid becoming too absorbed with the task at hand, such as keeping your head down at the key lock, occupying yourself with bags, books, or keys; staying alert can help prevent your becoming a target for crime.
  • Keep keys in hand to avoid unnecessary delay.
  • Plan ahead, always, even if you are late or in a rush.

Report Suspicious Activity/ Object on campus

Report suspicious activity or suspicious object to Campus Safety and Security immediately at 253-692-4416 or if you feel you are in immediate danger use the emergency blue phones located throughout the campus or call 9-1-1. Reporting suspicious activity/objects as soon as possible are essential in reducing campus crimes. You would be assisting Campus Safety and Security Department in promoting a safe, secure, and welcoming educational environment. Never hesitate to contact Campus Safety and Security Officers regarding your own or someone else’s safety on campus. We strongly urge you to program your cell phone with Campus Safety and Security’s office number: 253-692-4416.

 

Available Crime Information

Crime Prevention Information

You can stay up-to-date on crime in the area by checking crime prevention information posted at:

http://www.tacoma.uw.edu/campus-safety

At various campus events throughout the year we distribute information regarding Campus Safety and Security services and crime prevention programs. Crime prevention pamphlets can also be found at the Campus Safety and Security office at Dougan Building at 1711 Jefferson Avenue in room DOU 180.

Timely Warnings Notification

UW Tacoma Campus Safety and Security Director with the Crisis Communication team can issue an alert by campus email or by text message to inform the campus community of crimes the institution considers a serious or on-going threat to students and employees. These alerts are based on crimes reported to Campus Safety and Security or local law enforcement agencies. 

Emergency Notifications

You will be notified about emergencies in one or more of the following ways:

  • UW Alert: Register to be notified via cell phone, text message, campus email or personal email at www.uw.edu/alert
  • Talk-a-Phone Wide Area Broadcast System: Broadcast phones are installed on the campus for outdoor loudspeaker announcements.
  • Campus website: tacoma.uw.edu
  • Emergency Info Line: 253-383-INFO (4636)

Daily Incident Log

Campus Safety and Security maintains a daily incident log, which is written in an easily understood format and describes the basic nature of the crime, date the crime was reported, general location of the crime, and the disposition, if known.

We enter new reports or update previous ones within 72 hours after receiving the information. The log records all crimes reported to Campus Safety and Security.

You can access this log at Campus Safety and Security’s website:

http://www.tacoma.uw.edu/campus-safety/campus-crime-fire-log-reports

Listed is the most recent 60-day period of the log along with the last three years of Annual Security reports.

Classification of Crimes

Crimes listed herein are classified using the FBI Uniform Crime Reporting Handbook and relevant federal law (the Clery Act). Please see definitions at the end of this report.

For murder/non-negligent manslaughter, negligent manslaughter, rape, forcible fondling, incest and statutory rape, aggravated assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking the number of victims is indicated. For robbery, burglary, larceny, vandalism and arson, one offense is counted per distinct operation regardless of the number of victims.

For motor vehicle theft, each vehicle taken (or attempted to be taken) is counted separately. For liquor, drug and weapons violations, the statistics indicate each person arrested. Incidents of domestic violence, dating violence and stalking are counted according to the underlying crime—i.e., property crimes and robbery are counted by operation and crimes against persons except robbery are counted by the number of victims.

Hate crimes are not considered distinct offenses, but are crimes (such as assault or vandalism) motivated by the suspect’s bias. Most hate crimes are counted in the crime statistics in this brochure. The exceptions are simple assault, intimidation, larceny, vandalism and other crimes that involve bodily injury that are not included in the required reporting categories but are reported separately as hate crimes. Starting in 2014, crimes motivated by prejudice against a victim’s national origin and crimes motivated by prejudice against a victim’s gender identity are also reported as hate crimes.

Reporting Criminal Actions and Emergencies

Always dial 911 for emergencies or crimes in progress on campus that require police, fire, or medical response. Students, faculty, staff, and visitors should also notify Campus Security officers.

  • You can notify Campus Security officers by using any of the emergency phones located on campus. Press the EMERGENCY button on the box will activate the telephone connection. You can begin to speak when the phone is answered, through the speaker. All exterior emergency phones are tested by patrol units on a daily basis.
  • You can make reports in person at the Campus Safety and Security office or to a uniformed Campus Security officer on patrol throughout the campus. Reports made to Campus Safety and Security will be included in annual statistical compilations and the daily incident log when appropriate and will be evaluated for timely warning consideration. You can report incidents to other officials at the University of Washington Tacoma, including directors and heads of administrative units. These reports in turn will be communicated to Campus Safety and Security for disposition. These reports will also be included in annual statistical compilations.

Campus Safety and Security will help members of the UW Tacoma community contact outside law enforcement agencies such as Tacoma Police Department and other reporting authorities.

  • When we receive a report of an urgent situation, we dispatch officers to the scene to lend assistance, investigate, prepare a report, and conduct follow-up as needed. We contact Tacoma Fire Department and Tacoma Police Department when appropriate.
  • Campus Safety and Security officers conduct preliminary investigations of reported incidents. We contact the Tacoma Police Department, when appropriate, if any criminal information is discovered or other emergency responder agencies such as fire or medical.  

 

Policy Statements relating to Sexual Assault, Dating Violence, Domestic Violence and Stalking

The University of Washington is committed to establishing and maintaining a safe working and learning environment that is free from violence. The University has published policies that describe its prevention and response processes, which include:

Chapter 478-120 WAC – Student Conduct Code for the University of Washington

Student Governance and Policies Chapter 209- Student Conduct Policy for Academic Misconduct and Behavioral Misconduct – effective 8/18/17

Student Governance and Policies Chapter 210 - Student Conduct Policy for Discriminatory and Sexual Harassment, Intimate Partner Violence, Sexual Misconduct, Stalking and Retaliation – effective 8/18/17

Chapter 478-121 WAC - Student Conduct Code for the University of Washington – effective 8/18/17

Pursuant to chapter 34.05 RCW and the authority granted by RCW 28B.20.130, the board of regents of the University of Washington established rules under the Washington Administrative Code regarding student conduct and student discipline. 

Sexual misconduct is prohibited by the code, which includes committing, or aiding, soliciting, or attempting the commission of, the following prohibited conduct: Sexual assault, sexual harassment, sexual exploitation, indecent exposure, relationship violence, stalking, and domestic violence.  The code also prohibits retaliation against those who file a complaint, grievance, or allegation of misconduct under any university policy or rule or under any law; participate in and/or cooperates with an investigation; appears as a witness at a hearing; or opposes an unlawful act, discriminatory practice, or policy.

The University has been in the process of revising the Student Conduct Code to reflect the University’s compliance with developing laws, regulations, and guidance, particularly relating to adjudicating sexual misconduct matters. Supplementary provisions relating to sexual misconduct were made effective June 30, 2015 as temporary, emergency rules, which augmented and clarified sexual misconduct as prohibited conduct under the code. These supplementary provisions were incorporated into the conduct code along with other revisions to the chapter effective March 28, 2016 as final rules. Effective August 18, 2017, the University has a new Student Conduct Code and two companion policies.

Executive Order No. 31 – Non-discrimination and Affirmative Action

This policy has the goal of promoting an environment that is free of discrimination, harassment, and retaliation.  It prohibits sexual harassment, which is unwelcome and unsolicited language or conduct that is of a sexual nature and that is sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive that it could reasonably be expected to create an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working or learning environment, or has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's academic or work performance. This policy was revised effective June 21, 2016, to clarify that it also covers sexual violence, such as sexual assault and sexual exploitation and to clarify the intersection of this policy with Executive Order No. 51 – Sexual Violence Elimination.

Administrative Policy Statement (APS) 11.7

This policy prohibits domestic violence in the workplace and outlines prohibited behavior and University notifications, response and resources. It also, in accordance with state law, provides reasonable leave from work, intermittent leave, or leave on a reduced schedule so that an employee who is a victim of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking, or who has a family member who is a victim of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking may seek legal or law enforcement assistance, seek treatment by a health care provider, obtain or assist a family member to obtain mental health counseling, participate in safety planning to temporarily or permanently relocate or take other safety-related action to provide for the employee or family member's safety.

Administrative Policy Statement 11.8 – Reporting Suspected Child Abuse or Neglect 

This policy prohibits child abuse. Suspected perpetrators of child abuse, including University employees, volunteers, or students, may be removed from the premises and may be subject to arrest and criminal prosecution. Employees, volunteers, or students who engage in child abuse in the workplace, or who use University facilities, property, or resources to engage in child abuse are subject to disciplinary action, including dismissal from employment, engagement, or from educational programs. Additionally, all University employees and volunteers who have reasonable cause to believe that a child has suffered abuse or neglect must immediately report the suspected abuse or neglect to law enforcement or the Department of Social and Health Services. A child is anyone under the age of 18. 

Workplace Violence Policy

The University’s Workplace Violence policy prohibits behavior, whether direct or through the use of University facilities, property or resources that: is violent; threatens to harm; harasses or intimidates others; interferes with an individual’s legal rights of movement or expression; disrupts the workplace, the academic environment or the University’s ability to provide services to the public. These behaviors include relationship violence and stalking.

Executive Order No. 51 – Sexual Violence Elimination

This presidential policy prohibits the following behavior by members of the University community including students, employees, and members of the public when the University determines that an individual's behavior affects a University interest:

  • Domestic violence;
  • Relationship violence;
  • Stalking; and
  • Sexual assault.

The policy also prohibits retaliation against any individual who seeks resources, makes a referral, reports concerns, or who cooperates with or participates in any investigation of allegations of violations of this policy, or who is perceived to have engaged in any of these actions.  This policy became effective June 26, 2016, to comply with the Clery Act, including clarifying institutional definitions relating to sexual misconduct, describing reporting options and grievance processes, and identifying the University’s confidential advocates.

Educational Programs and Campaigns

The University is committed to providing prevention and awareness programs to students and employees relating to domestic violence, relationship violence, stalking, sexual assault, and retaliation. These include primary prevention and awareness programs directed at incoming students and new employees and ongoing prevention and awareness campaigns directed at students and employees. These programs and campaigns include information about:

  • University policies prohibiting domestic violence, relationship violence, stalking and sexual assault;
  • The definitions of domestic violence, relationship violence, stalking, sexual assault, and consent under Washington State law;
  • Bystander intervention techniques;
  • Risk reduction options to reduce perpetration and increase individual and community safety, and to empower individuals to act on their own behalves; and
  • The rights, processes, and resources provided by the University.

These educational programs are evidence-based, culturally relevant, inclusive of diverse communities and identities, sustainable, responsive to community needs, and informed by research or assessed for value, effectiveness, or outcome. These programs consider environmental risk and protective factors as they occur on the individual, relationship, institutional, community, and societal levels.

Student Success

Student Success provides support, advocacy, consultation, and education to the University of Washington Tacoma campus community. Student Success programs include Alcohol & Other Drug Consultation and Education, Suicide Intervention, Sexual Assault, Relationship Violence, Stalking and Harassment Advocacy and Support, and a general Student Care program.

Regularly-offered educational programs include the Relationship Skills and Consent Workshop, Sexual Assault and Relationship Violence Prevention, and Alcohol and Other Drug Education.  They also participate in campus-wide events and programming for the University community.

Bystander Intervention

UW Seattle campus Health & Wellness also facilitates the University’s participation in the Green Dot program which provides training courses designed to address and prevent power-based interpersonal violence, including sexual violence. The aim of Green Dot is to engage students as active bystanders who step in, speak up, and interrupt potential acts of violence. Green Dot seeks the participation of students, staff, and faculty to encourage them to foster a culture that is less tolerant of interpersonal violence. Green Dot trainings are free and offered regularly on campus for students, staff, and faculty.

Peer Health Educators

The Peer Health Educator (PHE) program in Health & Wellness is a group of student staff and volunteers who facilitate workshops and events around campus on the topics of mental health, interpersonal violence prevention and alcohol and other drug education. PHEs offer a workshop titled “Let’s Talk About Mental Health” and provide resource tables during campus events. PHEs also collaborate with the UW Greek Community to address and prevent sexual violence in that community. PHEs organize a one-week celebration in the spring called “Sextravaganza” which includes panels and events relating to healthy sexual relationships.

Inter-collegiate Athletics 

The University provides regular training and educational programs designed for its student athletes relating to sexual violence, healthy relationships, alcohol and drug abuse, consent, and interpersonal violence. The UW Tacoma campus currently participates in intramural sports programs, and does not have any inter-collegiate athletic relations. 

Fraternities and Sororities 

Although fraternities and sororities are independent organizations located off-campus on property not owned or controlled by the university, there has been a long-standing and positive relationship between the university and the Greek Community. The University enters recognition agreements with fraternities and sororities that seek official recognition by UW. For the past four years, the University’s recognition agreements have included an educational programming section requiring each chapter to conduct at least one educational program on sexual assault and relationship violence and one program on controlled substance abuse awareness. The UW Tacoma campus currently does have any recognized fraternities or sororities. 

Sexual Harassment Prevention

Human Resources provides a New Employee Orientation and an in-person Prevention of Sexual Harassment training for all new staff members, which they are expected to complete within two months of hire. The program introduces new employees to the University’s culture, shared values, leadership and key University policies.  This program is being enhanced to offer an online option, which is expected to launch in the 2016-2017 academic year. 

Additionally, individual schools, colleges, and administrative departments offer their own training programs for new employees and current employees. The University is currently developing more comprehensive training programs for faculty and other academic personnel, with implementation planned in the 2016-2017 academic year.

Other educational programs have been developed through collaboration with Health & Wellness and Safe Campus emphasizing University employees in roles that have a high degree of interaction with students. 

1. Definitions of Crimes in Washington State

The University prohibits the crimes of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking as defined in the Clery Act. Additionally, these behaviors may be crimes in Washington state. Following are the relevant definitions under the criminal code: 

(a) Sexual Assault and Consent 

Under Washington state criminal law, there is no crime of “sexual assault.” Instead, crimes are classified as “Sex Offenses.”  See Chapter 9A.44 RCW.  Another classification is “Assault,” which also governs assault with a sexual motivation. 

Following are the definitions of rape crimes under Washington state criminal law:

RCW 9A.44.040 – Rape in the first degree

(1) A person is guilty of rape in the first degree when such person engages in sexual intercourse with another person by forcible compulsion where the perpetrator or an accessory:

(a) Uses or threatens to use a deadly weapon or what appears to be a deadly weapon; or

(b) Kidnaps the victim; or

(c) Inflicts serious physical injury, including but not limited to physical injury which renders the victim unconscious; or

(d) Feloniously enters into the building or vehicle where the victim is situated.

RCW 9A.44.050 (1) (b) – Rape in the second degree

(1) A person is guilty of rape in the second degree when, under circumstances not constituting rape in the first degree, the person engages in sexual intercourse with another person:

(a) By forcible compulsion;

(b) When the victim is incapable of consent by reason of being physically helpless or mentally incapacitated…

RCW 9A.44.060 – Rape in the third degree

(1) A person is guilty of rape in the third degree when, under circumstances not constituting rape in the first or second degrees, such person engages in sexual intercourse with another person:

(a) Where the victim did not consent as defined in RCW 9A.44.010(7), to sexual intercourse with the perpetrator and such lack of consent was clearly expressed by the victim’s words or conduct, or

(b) Where there is threat of substantial unlawful harm to property rights of the victim.

RCW 9A.44.010 (7) – Consent

“Consent” means that at the time of the act of sexual intercourse or sexual contact there are actual words or conduct indicating freely given agreement to have sexual intercourse or sexual contact.

RCW 9A.44.100 – Indecent liberties

[Paraphrase] A victim is incapable of giving consent when physically helpless or mentally incapacitated

b) Domestic Violence and Dating (Relationship) Violence

The Washington State Criminal Code does not contain a separate crime of “domestic violence” or “dating violence.”  Instead, crimes relating to domestic violence and dating violence are covered by other provisions of the criminal code, such as “Sexual Offenses” or “Assault” crimes.  The law is gender neutral and recognizes that domestic violence occurs between members of the same or any sex.

RCW 26.50.010 – Domestic violence

(a) Physical harm, bodily injury, assault, or the infliction of fear of imminent physical harm, bodily injury or assault, between family or household members;

(b) Sexual assault of one family or household member by another; or

(c) Stalking as defined in RCW 9A.46.110 of one family or household member by another family or household member.

“Family or household members” means spouses, domestic partners, former spouses, former domestic partners, persons who have a child in common regardless of whether they have been married or have lived together at any time, adult persons related by blood or marriage, adult persons who are presently residing together or who have resided together in the past, persons sixteen years of age or older who are presently residing together or who have resided together in the past and who have or have had a dating relationship, persons sixteen years of age or older with whom a person sixteen years of age or older has or has had a dating relationship, and persons who have a biological or legal parent-child relationship, including stepparents and stepchildren and grandparents and grandchildren.

“Dating relationship” means a social relationship of a romantic nature. Factors include: (a) The length of time the relationship has existed; (b) the nature of the relationship; and (c) the frequency of interaction between the parties.

c) Stalking

The crime of “stalking” is defined in RCW 9A.46.110 under the classification of crimes of “Harassment.” There is also a separate crime of “cyberstalking” under RCW 9.61.260 (the Malicious Mischief-Injury to Property crimes).

RCW 9A.46.110 (1) – Stalking

A person commits the crime of stalking if, without lawful authority and under circumstances not amounting to a felony attempt of another crime:

a. He or she intentionally and repeatedly harasses or repeatedly follows another person; and

b. The person being harassed or followed is placed in fear that the stalker intends to injure the person, another person, or property of the person or of another person. The feeling of fear must be one that a reasonable person in the same situation would experience under all the circumstances; and

c. The stalker either:

i. Intends to frighten, intimidate, or harass the person; or

ii. Knows or reasonably should know that the person is afraid, intimidated, or harassed even if the stalker did not intend to place the person in fear or intimidate or harass the person.

RCW 9.61.260(1) – Cyberstalking

A person is guilty of cyberstalking if he or she, with intent to harass, intimidate, torment, or embarrass any other person, and under circumstances not constituting telephone harassment, makes an electronic communication to such other person or a third party:

a. Using any lewd, lascivious, indecent, or obscene words, images, or language, or suggesting the commission of any lewd or lascivious act;

b. Anonymously or repeatedly whether or not conversation occurs; or

c. Threatening to inflict injury on the person or property of the person called or any member of his or her family or household.

(5) For purposes of this section, “electronic communication” means the transmission of information by wire, radio, optical cable, electromagnetic, or other similar means. “Electronic communication” includes, but is not limited to, electronic mail, internet-based communications, pager service, and electronic text messaging.

2. Procedures Victims Should Follow in the Case of Alleged Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, or Stalking

The University has created a Sexual Assault Resources website for those impacted by sexual assault, dating/relationship violence, domestic violence, or stalking. This website is intended to provide comprehensive information about the available resources, reporting options, and University response policies and procedures.  Following are the steps an individual who has experienced sexual misconduct may take.

a) Contact the University’s Confidential Advocates 

Individuals are urged to contact one of the University’s confidential advocates, who can provide a private place for individuals to seek support, information, and assistance.  They can also provide individuals with support in taking any or all of the following steps. 

Disclosures made to a confidential advocate do not constitute a report to the University for the purposes of initiating an investigation. Individuals have the right to report sexual misconduct to the University, to the police, to both or not at all.  If individuals do choose to report to the police or the University, the advocates can provide individuals with information and support in reporting. 

The advocates can also assist with how to apply for Orders of Protection, regardless of whether individuals make a police report. Orders of Protection can make it illegal for a person to contact individuals. The advocates can also assist individuals with implementing an order at the University.

Advocates have limitations to confidentiality when on notice of:

  • Abuse and neglect of a child under the age of 18
  • Elder abuse or the abuse of a disabled adult
  • A plan for suicide or harm to others

Confidential advocates may also be required to disclose information that is otherwise protected from disclosure in response to a valid subpoena or court order.

b) Seek Medical Care and Forensic Exams

Individuals are urged to seek medical care. Medical care after a sexual assault can be helpful for treating or preventing illness and injury. It is also an important way to preserve evidence.  Not all hospitals provide forensic exams/rape kits. If individuals are interested in evidence collection, as well as medical care, individuals must go to a hospital with trained Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE). SANE nurses are specially trained to work with patients who have been sexually assaulted. Important things to know:

  • Individuals are not required to make a police report to get a SANE exam.
  • There is no charge for a SANE exam.Individuals may bring a friend or family member with them.
  • Preserving evidence keeps options open in case individuals decide to report.

It is recommended to be treated as soon as possible; evidence is best collected within 120 hours (five days) of the assault.

Information relating to local hospitals and SANE nurses is available on the Sexual Assault Resources website.

c) Seek Support for Safety Planning

The confidential advocates can also provide support in safety planning. The University can assist individuals by implementing safety measures, such as arranging for housing, academic and work accommodations, and/or providing assistance with transportation planning. These safety measures can be implemented when reasonably available and may be on an interim or permanent basis. The University will maintain the confidentiality of any safety measures provided to the extent practicable. Safety measures are available whether or not a report is made to the University or local law enforcement.

d) Seek Counseling

For support, the University offers several options for counseling services. Counseling can assist with recovery from a traumatic experience. 

For Students

The UW Tacoma Student Counseling Center offers free short-term counseling services
PH: 253-692-4522
Web: http://www.tacoma.uw.edu/counseling

For Employees

UW CareLink is an employee assistance program for benefits-eligible faculty and staff that can provide counseling support.
PH: 1-866-598-3978 (TTY: 1-877-334-0489)
Web: http://hr.uw.edu/worklife/uw-carelink

State law protects the confidentiality of counseling relationships. However, counselors also have limitations on confidentiality when on notice of:

  • Abuse and neglect of a child under the age of 18
  • Elder abuse or the abuse of a disabled adult
  • A plan for suicide or harm to others

Information retained in healthcare records that is otherwise protected from disclosure, may be subject to disclosure in response to a valid subpoena or court order.

e) Seek Disability Accommodations

If individuals are experiencing impacts of a medical condition or the experience has triggered an existing condition, they should consider seeking accommodations through the disability support offices:

Disability Resources for Students - UW Tacoma
PH: 253-692-4522
Web: http://www.tacoma.uw.edu/drs

Disability Services Office (for University employees)
PH: 206-685-7264
Web: http://www.washington.edu/admin/dso

f) Consider Reporting to the University  

The University provides procedures for the investigation and resolution of complaints relating to domestic violence, relationship violence, sexual assault, stalking or retaliation. The University will respond to complaints regardless of whether a complaint is filed with a law enforcement agency.

Effective May 16, 2016, the University created the Title IX Investigation Office, which is responsible for investigating allegations that a University student has violated the sexual misconduct provisions of the Student Conduct Code.  Previously, such allegations were investigated by Community Standards and Student Conduct.  Following is the contact information: 

Title IX Investigation Office
Phone: 206-616-5334
Email: tixinv@uw.edu

Complaints that any University employee has violated Executive Orders No. 31 or 51 can be made to the University Complaint Investigation Resolution Office (UCIRO).  This includes complaints involving faculty and other academic personnel, staff, Academic Student Employees (ASEs), and student employees.  Following is the contact information:

University Complaint Investigation Resolution Office (UCIRO)
Phone: 206-616-2028
Email: uciro@uw.edu

Human Resources may also respond to and investigate complaints involving University employees:

  • Campus Human Resources — For complaints involving UW Seattle staff, UW Bothell staff, and UW Tacoma campus staff employees, including student employees.  Phone: 206-543-2354
  • Harborview Medical Center (HMC) Human Resources — For complaints involving HMC staff employees, including student employees. Phone: 206-744-9220
  • UW Medical Center (UWMC) Human Resources — For complaints involving UWMC staff employees, including student employees. Phone: 206-598-6116


g) Consider Reporting to Law Enforcement

Tacoma Police Department supports members of the University community with its Sexual Assault Response Commitment that pledges to assist with courtesy, sensitivity and professionalism. Reporting the incident to the police is encouraged regardless of the availability of evidence.

UW Tacoma Campus Safety and Security also has long, collaborative relationships with Tacoma Police Department.  These departments have recently entered into a memorandum of understanding that confirms and clarifies this collaboration, including how information is shared between these departments.

h) Seek Protective Measures

If individuals decide they want the University to conduct an investigation or they make a report to the police, the University will evaluate and implement protective measures designed so that they can avoid contact with the other person while an investigation is ongoing.  The types of protective measures that University can put in place will depend on their unique circumstances and needs and the impacts on the other person.

Options for protective measures may include, but are not limited to:

  • Issuing a no-contact directive that prohibits contact between them and the other person, including within student organizations;
  • Reassignment of the other person in University housing; and/or
  • Adjusting the other person’s campus work or academic schedules.

i) Seek Other University and Community Resources

The University has a variety of other services available including legal assistance, VISA and immigration assistance, and student financial aid assistance.  Information about available services at the University and in the local community can also be obtained from a confidential advocate or on the Sexual Assault Resource webpage.

3) Procedures the University Will Follow in the Case of Alleged Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, or Stalking

When students or employees report to the University that they have experienced sexual assault, dating/relationship violence, domestic violence, or stalking, they will be provided with written notification of:

  • the importance of preserving evidence as may be necessary to the proof of a crime or in obtaining a protection order;
  • to whom the alleged offense may be reported, including options regarding law enforcement and campus authorities and their option to
    • notify proper law enforcement authorities, including on-campus and local police;
    • be assisted by campus authorities in notifying law enforcement authorities if they choose; and
    • decline to notify such authorities;
  • their rights and the University’s responsibilities regarding orders of protection, no contact orders, restraining orders, or similar lawful orders issued by a criminal, civil, or tribal court;
  • procedures for disciplinary action in cases of alleged domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking, which will
    • Provide a prompt, fair, and impartial investigation and resolution
    • be conducted by officials who receive annual training on the issues related to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking and how to conduct an investigation and hearing process that protects the safety of those involved and promotes accountability;
    • provide the complainant and respondent with the same opportunities to have others present during a disciplinary proceeding, including the opportunity to be accompanied to any related meeting or proceeding by an advisor of their choice;
    • simultaneously inform the complainant and the respondent, in writing, of the outcome of any disciplinary proceeding; the University’s procedures for the complainant and respondent to appeal the results of the disciplinary proceeding, if available; of any change to the results that occurs prior to the time that such results become final; and when the results become final.
  • Possible sanctions or protective measures that the University may impose following a final determination of a disciplinary procedure;
  • Information about how the University will protect their confidentiality, including how publicly-available recordkeeping will be accomplished without the inclusion of identifying information, to the extent permissible by law;
  • Information about existing counseling, health, mental health, victim advocacy, legal assistance, and other services both on-campus and in the community;
  • Options for, and available assistance in, changing academic, living, transportation, and working situations, if requested, and if such accommodations are reasonably available, regardless of whether they choose to report the crime to campus police or local law enforcement.

The university has designated a Title IX Coordinator to oversee implementation of university policy and facilitate the university’s compliance with Title IX and related authority.  The University's Title IX Coordinator is available to review individual concerns relating to compliance and to provide compliance support for programs, departments, schools, colleges, and campuses relating to discrimination based on sex:

Kate Leonard, Title IX/ADA Coordinator
Phone: 206-221-7932
Email: titleix@uw.edu

Procedures for University Investigation and Disciplinary Action

The process the University will follow to investigate and resolve the complaint depends on the relationship to the University of the person against whom the complaint is made. The University's processes for investigation and resolution of complaints are as follows:

Effective August 18, 2017, the University has a new Student Conduct Code and two companion policies.

Investigations are designed to provide a prompt, fair, and impartial complaint investigation and resolution, and to equitably protect the rights of individuals participating in the investigation. Participants may be supported by an advisor that may be an attorney throughout the process. The following is general information about the investigation process.

The individuals who conduct University investigations or participate in University hearings receive, at a minimum, annual training on the issues related to domestic violence, relationship violence, stalking, sexual assault, and retaliation and on conducting investigations and hearings that fosters safety, equitable treatment of the parties, and that promote accountability.

First, a staff member of the investigation office meets with each complainant to gather information about the complaint and to provide information about the complaint process, including the complainant's rights and options under this and other University policies. After initial review of the complaint, the complainant will be informed of the action the University will take.

Before an investigation is opened, protective measures will be considered and implemented as they are reasonably available. Protective measures may include changing academic, living, transportation, and/or working arrangements, and taking steps to limit contact between the individuals involved. As necessary, investigation offices will assist individuals potentially at risk with safety planning, either directly or with the assistance of other University offices, such as the confidential advocates or Safe Campus.

When an investigation is opened, the subject of the investigation will be provided with a written explanation of their rights and options under this and other relevant University policies and information about the investigation process. The assigned investigator will gather evidence, conduct interviews of the complainant, subject, and witnesses. During the investigation, the complainant and the subject will have the opportunity to identify witnesses and provide the investigator with evidence. The university strives to complete the investigation within 60 days.

The University uses a "preponderance of evidence" standard to determine whether a violation of University policy has occurred. "Preponderance of evidence" means that based on all of the relevant evidence, the facts demonstrate that it is "more likely than not" that the subject of the investigation violated one or more University policies.

The complainant and the subject of the complaint will concurrently be informed in writing of the result of the investigation, the rationale for the result, and whether there is an option to appeal a result. The result includes any initial, interim, or final decisions. The university’s goal is to complete investigations within 60 business days. This timeframe may need to be extended depending on the complexity of the matter or to coordinate with law enforcement. 

The University follows the Student Conduct Code or the Faculty Code in matters where a University student or faculty member is the subject of a complaint. In accordance with these processes, a hearing may be convened to assess the evidence relating to the complaint, make findings, and determine appropriate actions, if any. The complainant and subject will be concurrently informed in writing of the result of the hearing, the rationale for the result, and whether there is an option to seek an appeal. The result includes any initial, interim, or final decisions. 

Information relating to an investigation is kept confidential by the investigation offices and is provided only to those persons who have a legitimate educational or business need to know, including the subject of the complaint, witnesses, the administrative head of the University unit involved, the Title IX Coordinator, and the appropriate human resources staff and/or the Provost's Office, as necessary. Some information relevant to the investigation may be protected from disclosure, such as healthcare information protected by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) or student records protected by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).

4) Confidentiality and Recordkeeping

Information relating to an investigation is kept confidential by the investigation offices and is provided only to those persons who have a legitimate educational or business need to know, including the subject of the complaint, witnesses, the administrative head of the University unit involved, the Title IX Coordinator, and the appropriate human resources staff and/or the Provost's Office, as necessary.

Records retained by University offices may be subject to disclosure under Chapter 42.56 RCW, the Washington State Public Records Act, unless otherwise protected from disclosure by law. Some information, such as healthcare information protected by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) or other state laws, student records protected by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), or information that is otherwise exempt from the Public Records Act, will not be subject to disclosure under that Act. Information retained in University records that is otherwise protected from disclosure, may be subject to disclosure pursuant to a valid subpoena or court order.

In accordance with the Clery Act, the University must also disclose statistical information relating to crimes of domestic violence, relationship violence, stalking, sexual assault, in its annual security report and issue timely warnings. This reporting is done without disclosing personally identifying information relating to the victim of such crimes, including information likely to disclose the location of the victim.

5) Available Sanctions

A University community member who engages in behavior in violation of University policies is subject to corrective or disciplinary action, including but not limited to, termination of employment, termination from educational programs, or termination of any non-employment relationship. The available sanctions depend on the relationship to the University of the person against whom the complaint is made:

  • Sanctions which may be imposed against faculty are set forth in the Faculty Code;
  • Sanctions which may be imposed against students are set forth in Chapter 478-120 WAC, Student Conduct Code for the University of Washington;
  • Sanctions which may be imposed against contract classified staff and other represented University employees are set forth in the relevant University of Washington labor contract;
  • Sanctions which may be imposed against classified non-union staff are set forth in Title 357 WAC and in Administrative Policy Statement 43.16, Corrective Action Policy for Permanent Classified Non-Union Staff;
  • Sanctions which may be imposed against professional staff are set forth in Administrative Policy Statement 42.1, Professional Staff Program, and the University of Washington Professional Staff Program details;
  • Sanctions which may be imposed against those in librarian appointments are set forth in the Librarian Personnel Code; and
  • Sanctions against other individuals will depend on the nature of their relationship with the University.

Individuals may also be removed from University premises, temporarily or permanently banned from the University premises, and/or subject to arrest and/or criminal prosecution.

6) Sex Offenders

In accordance to the Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act of 2000, which amends the Jacob Wetterling Crimes Against Children and Sexually Violent Offender Registration Act, the Jeanne Clery Act and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 and Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 (42 U.S.C. 16921), the University of Washington provides a link to the Washington State Sex Offender Registry. All sex offenders are required to register in the state of Washington and institutions of higher education in Washington are notified if that person is employed, carries a vocation or is a student at that institution. http://www.waspc.org/sex-offender-information

In addition, all sex offenders are required to deliver written notice of their status as a sex offender to the University of Washington Tacoma Campus Safety and Security department no later than three (3) business days prior to their enrollment in, employment with, volunteering at or residence at the University of Washington Tacoma. Such notification may be disseminated by the University of Washington Tacoma to, and for the safety and well-being of, the campus community, and may be considered by the University of Washington Tacoma for enrollment and discipline purposes.

 

Access to Campus Facilities

University of Washington Tacoma has an open environment allowing individuals to move freely around the campus; however, the University restricts access to its facilities to members of the academic community and bona fide guests. This open environment makes all members of the University community responsible for immediately reporting suspicious activity to Campus Safety and Security. You should report suspicious incidents, activities, or persons to Campus Safety and Security (253-692-4416) as soon as possible. Your vigilance is essential in helping Campus Safety and Security promote campus safety and reduce campus crime.

In order to uphold this policy, all students, faculty, and staff must have a University of Washington Tacoma ID card and present it when requested by a University official. Individuals whom Campus Safety and Security officers challenge for suspicious activity must identify themselves and present student, employee, or other identification, as requested. Individuals who do not have legitimate reasons for being on campus or in a University building, and who refuse to comply with a request to leave, may be subject to being trespassed from the campus or arrested by Tacoma Police Department if criminal activity is determined to have taken place.

Grounds

Access to the grounds is generally not controlled. The University, facilities and adjacent unlit areas are closed at dark. Campus Safety and Security officers will question individuals observed displaying suspicious behavior, or suspected of unlawful acts. Campus Safety and Security stresses no one should hesitate to contact them with any suspicion regarding their own or someone else’s safety.

Academic and Administrative Buildings

Buildings are open during regular business and class hours. Instructional facilities are generally open from 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., Monday through Thursday and on Friday and Saturday from 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., while classes are in session. Other areas may be open for 24-hour use during exam periods or for other special needs as requested. Patrol officers lock and unlock exterior building entrances in accordance with the building’s schedule. They admit individuals to locked buildings and areas only if they have valid identification and written authorization.

On-Campus Student Housing

UW Tacoma offers students the opportunity to live on-campus in a community-based living environment. As a resident in UW Tacoma Court 17 you will have the opportunity to live with other UW Tacoma students in a vibrant community. The apartments are locked 24 hours a day, and have an electronic system control access. The University had purchase the building as of July 2016 and during this transition the student housing program now includes all five floors. Residents and visitors enter through the main entrance only. Residents use a magnetic access card to open the building door that is issued by UW Tacoma Student Housing. Residents are held responsible for the actions of their guests. We encourage students to lock their room doors at all times.

Off-Campus Student Housing

University of Washington Tacoma does not provide off-campus housing but has listings of available housing in the area. Students should contact landlords directly about rentals or property. These listings are updated regularly and can be found here: http://www.tacoma.uw.edu/residence-life-housing/campus-housing

Emergency Phones

Emergency phones are two-way call boxes, mounted on standalone towers or pillars with blue lights on top. These telephones automatically connect to the Campus Safety and Security office—just press the button on the box. If you need help, this allows you to speak directly with a Campus Safety and Security officer. Eleven emergency telephones are strategically located on the grounds of the University. The location of an activated telephone is displayed in the Campus Safety and Security office so that officers can be dispatched to investigate, even if there is no voice communication. Note: You may dial #333 or #300 from any on-campus telephone to contact Campus Safety and Security but in an emergency dial 911 to be connected with Tacoma Police Department for assistance.

Alarms systems

Areas in academic and administrative buildings are connected to intrusion alarms that report to an external alarm company who monitors those areas. If an alarm is tripped then the alarm company calls TPD who responds along with Campus Safety and Security. There is also are fire, priority, supervisory and trouble alarm panels in each main university building and in the Campus Safety and Security office. Upgrades and expansions of these systems are planned and installed annually. These alarms are monitored by Campus Safety and Security, the external alarm companies and also sound an audible alert.

Security Consideration in Maintenance

Campus Safety and Security officers routinely check lighting on campus during regularly assigned patrols. When they find lights that are out or dim, they initiate a work order for Facilities Services (FS). FS maintains University facilities with safety and security in mind. University officers and FS work closely together to identify any broken doors, windows, locks, lights, or other hazards. These items receive expedited maintenance action. We encourage all members of the University to promptly report any unsafe facility conditions by calling 253-692-5700 or e-mail them at facility@uw.edu. You can report any conditions that cause concern about personal safety and property protection to Campus Safety and Security by calling 253-692-4416. Campus Safety and Security personnel regularly inspect campus facilities to assess potential risks and make recommendations for improvements.

 

University Alcohol and Drug Policy

University of Washington Tacoma is committed to maintaining a healthy and safe community through education and intervention efforts for alcohol and other drugs. UWT community members uphold university policies and abide by local, state, and federal laws pertaining to alcohol and other drugs. Individuals accept personal responsibility for the outcome of their decisions regarding alcohol and other drugs.

Policies of University of Washington Tacoma regarding alcohol and other drugs are covered in the staff manual, the Student Conduct Code, off-campus housing, and the alcohol and drug policies.

Student Housing Regulations

The following types of student misconduct which subject a student to disciplinary action include but are not limited to: the sale, distribution, use, or possession of alcohol; the violation of university policies pertaining to the sale, distribution, use, or possession of alcohol in the residence halls; knowingly and voluntarily being in the presence of alcohol in the residence halls; the sale, distribution, use, or possession of any illegal drug or drug paraphernalia in the residence halls; and knowingly and voluntarily being in the presence of any illegal drug or drug paraphernalia in the residence halls.

Student Conduct Code

In addition to the residence hall regulations, the following types of student misconduct, which subject a student to disciplinary action, include but are not limited to: unauthorized possession, use, manufacture, distribution, and/or sale of any controlled substance or illegal drug and illegal drug paraphernalia; violation of University policies pertaining to the sale, distribution, use, or possession of alcohol; violation of local, state, or federal law.

Faculty and Staff Conduct

Employee misconduct, including that of all full-time faculty and staff, adjunct faculty, and part-time staff, related to alcohol or other drug abuse will not be tolerated. Violation of the University’s Alcohol and Drug Abuse Policy or the Guidelines for Serving Alcohol at University Events will result in appropriate disciplinary action in accordance with University policies. Such disciplinary action may include termination of employment and referral for legal prosecution.

Obvious examples of prohibited conduct include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • The unauthorized use, possession, manufacture, distribution, dispensation or sale of alcohol, drugs or drug paraphernalia on University premises, on University business, in University-supplied vehicles, during the employee’s work hours, or during University-sponsored activities.
  • Coming to work, or performing any job duties, while impaired by alcohol or drugs on University premises, in University-supplied vehicles, in any location while on University business, or during University-sponsored activities.
  • The possession, use, manufacture, distribution, dispensation or sale of alcohol or drugs off University premises that may adversely affect the individual’s work performance, his or her own or others safety at work or the University’s reputation in the community.
  • Failure to adhere to the requirements of any drug treatment or counseling program in which the employee is enrolled or conviction under any criminal drug statute for a violation occurring in the workplace or in another location while on University business or during University-sponsored activities, or conviction under any criminal drug statute under circumstances that adversely affect the University’s reputation in the community.
  • Failure to notify the University of any conviction, within five (5) days of the conviction, under any criminal drug statute for a violation occurring in the workplace, on University premises, on University business, in University-supplied vehicles, during employee’s work hours, in University-supplied vehicles, during employee’s work hours, or during University-sponsored activities.
  • Deliberate failure to comply with the requirements of law or federal rules and regulations under the University’s Alcohol and Drug Abuse Policy.

Alcohol Policy

University of Washington Tacoma is committed to maintaining a healthy and safe academic community that reflects high standards of personal responsibility and behavior. Alcohol abuse will not be tolerated under any circumstances. This policy permits the responsible use of alcohol in moderation by persons of legal drinking age and in accord with these guidelines.

Guidelines and Procedures for the Sale or Serving of Alcoholic Beverages on Campus

General guidance for the sale or serving of alcoholic beverages on campus can be found in the UW Administrative Policy Statement 13.9 and WAC 478-136-030. Specific guidelines and procedures applicable to the UW Tacoma campus are described below.

Noncompliance by individuals or groups with these guidelines and procedures, or with any of the laws or regulations regarding the sale or serving of alcohol at UW Tacoma, may jeopardize future use of campus facilities and may result in other disciplinary or legal actions as deemed appropriate.

Faculty, Staff and Non-University Groups

Serving alcohol at an event in UW Tacoma facilities by faculty, staff and members of the external community will require the following:

  1. Compliance with all the requirements of UW Administrative Policy on the Sale and Serving of Alcoholic Beverages (Administrative Policy Statement 13.9) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC 478-136-030). Among these requirements and UW Tacoma procedures suggested by these requirements are:
    • Alcohol may not be possessed or consumed by anyone under the age of 21;
    • Persons under 21 may attend an event if there are effective safeguards to prevent the consumption of alcohol by minors. Safeguards should be in the form of entry control, identification of minors and supervision of the service bar;
    • Alcohol will not be served to anyone who appears intoxicated;
    • Non-alcoholic beverages and food will also be available at the event;
    • Serving of alcoholic beverages must be complimentary to and part of the planned event program;
    • “No-host” bars (which charge for alcohol by the drink) are not permitted except with licensed servers or bartenders;
    • Individual event participants cannot bring their own alcoholic beverages;
    • The serving of alcohol at the event cannot be advertised in UW Tacoma press releases, printed ads, posters or similar media.
    • Alcohol must be consumed only within the approved designated area for the event;
    • Special security and other requirements for the event may result as part of the Use of University Facilities (UUF) process and/or the approval process by the Office of the Chancellor.
    • All University-sponsored or University-funded events held off-campus where alcohol will be served must receive prior approval for the serving of alcohol through the Office of the Chancellor. 
  2. Submission of the forms below to the Office of the Chancellor for approval before the date of the scheduled event. This process will include the following:
    • Acquisition of a Banquet Permit (per RCW 66.24.481) authorizing the service and consumption of liquor at a banquet or organized gathering at a specified date and place or a Special Occasion License (per RCW 66.24.380) authorizing the sale of alcoholic beverages at a special occasion on a specified date and place. Acquiring this permit or license can be a lengthy process and should be applied for well in advance of the planned event. The Banquet Permit or Special Occasion License must also be posted in a conspicuous place within the designated area during the event;
    • Completion and approval of an Alcohol Event Responsibility Form and an Alcohol Event Response Form available through the Office of the Chancellor at least ten day prior to the scheduled event. Among other conditions, these forms require:
      1. Compliance with all UW Tacoma Use of University Facilities (UUF) forms and procedures;
      2. For large events (as determined by the Office of the Chancellor), alcohol must be served by a licensed vendor who also provides options for food and non-alcoholic beverages as part of the menu for the event. The vendor will be responsible for identifying underage individuals and ensuring compliance with state law and control board regulations regarding alcohol sale and service, but at least one signatory must be present for the event.
      3. For small events (as determined by the Office of the Chancellor), signatories for the event will be responsible for identifying underage individuals and ensuring compliance with state law and Liquor Control Board regulations regarding alcohol sale and service. Signatories may employ licensed bartenders, but at least one signatory must be present at all times to oversee the event.

Additional Information

Questions about the Alcohol Policy should be directed to the Office of the Chancellor. The University reserves the right to amend this policy in accordance with local and federal laws, community standards, or the best interests of the University.

Drug Policy

Possession and/or use of illicit drugs and unauthorized controlled substances are contrary to University policy and in violation of federal and Washington state laws. The University prohibits the possession, use, manufacture, distribution and/or sale of illegal drugs and illegal paraphernalia. Students, staff or faculty at the University using or otherwise involved with drugs in violation of University drug policy are subject to University disciplinary action, in addition to any action taken by local or federal law enforcement authorities. Information regarding the drug policy can be found here: http://www.tacoma.uw.edu/campus-safety/policies-laws?panel=1#drug-policy

Cooperation with Law Enforcement Authorities

The University cooperates fully with law enforcement authorities. Violations of the Code of Conduct or on-campus housing, which are also violations of federal or local law, may be referred to external enforcement. In such situations, cases may proceed concurrently at the University and in the criminal justice system.

University Sanctions for Violating Alcohol and Drug Policies

Students and employees who are found to be in violation of this state prohibition may be subject to arrest and conviction under the applicable criminal laws of local municipalities, the state of Washington or the United States. Conviction can result in sanctions including probation, fines and imprisonment. While the University will make every reasonable effort to assist employees who make it known that they have an alcohol or drug abuse problem, it will not intrude upon the private decisions of its employees who are responsible for resolving any alcohol or drug abuse problems they may have. Unresolved job performance problems that result from alcohol or drug abuse are grounds for disciplinary action, including termination. Students found in violation of this stated prohibition are also subject to discipline in accordance with the requirements and procedures of the Student Conduct Code (Chapter 478–120 WAC). Discipline may include disciplinary probation, suspension or dismissal from the University.

Description of Drug and Alcohol Abuse Education Programs

On-Campus Resources

In case of an emergency, dial 911 to contact for Fire/Medical/Police response. If you are ever in doubt about your own health and safety or somebody else’s, call for help.

Student and Enrollment Services (253-692-4501) provides general information about campus resources. It also assists students through various organized groups interested in educating the campus community about alcohol and drug use and related health issues.

Student Counseling Center (Student Success)

The Student Counseling Center offers short-term, problem-focused counseling to UW Tacoma students who may feel overwhelmed by the responsibilities of college, work, family, and relationships. Counselors are available to help students cope with stresses and personal issues that may interfere with their ability to perform in school. The service is provided confidentially and without additional charge to currently enrolled undergraduate and graduate students. To schedule an appointment, please call 253- 692-4522 or stop by the Student Counseling Center (SCC), located in MAT 354. Additional information can also be found by visiting http://www.tacoma.uw.edu/counseling.

UW CareLink, a service of UW Human Resources, offers an array of substance abuse prevention and intervention programs for faculty and staff that have a problem with alcohol or other drugs. Please call UW CareLink at 1-866-598-3978 for further information or visit the CareLink website at: http://hr.uw.edu/worklife/uw-carelink/

Off-Campus Resources

While UW Tacoma strives to help members of the campus community learn about alcohol and other drugs, we realize that sometimes students may wish to seek off-campus help. Following is a list of contacts and resources:

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)
3640 S. Cedar Street
Tacoma, WA 98405-5700
253-474-8897
www.piercecountyaa.org

Pierce County Narcotics Anonymous
P.O. Box 706
Tacoma, WA 98401
Hotline: 253-531-8792
www.pcana.org

Communicable Disease Information
3629 S. D Street
Tacoma, WA 98045
253-798-6410

National Drug and Alcohol Treatment
Routing Service
1-800-662-HELP

National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information
301-468-2600
www.health.org/resref.htm

U.S. Department of Justice
Drug Enforcement Administration
Pierce County AIDS Foundation
625 Commerce St, Suite 10
Tacoma, WA 98402
253-383-2565
www.piercecountyaids.org
www.usdoj.gov/dea

Local and Federal Laws

The following is a brief summary of state of Washington and federal laws pertaining to alcohol and drugs. This is not an exhaustive list and is subject to change. The law constantly evolves and is subject to different interpretations.

Washington State Crimes and Penalties — Alcohol

Persons under 21 - Minor in Possession and Consumption

RCW 66.44.270

(1) It is unlawful for any person to sell, give, or otherwise supply liquor to any person under the age of twenty-one years or permit any person under that age to consume liquor on his or her premises or on any premises under his or her control. For the purposes of this subsection, "premises" includes real property, houses, buildings, and other structures, and motor vehicles and watercraft. A violation of this subsection is a gross misdemeanor punishable as provided for in chapter 9A.20 RCW.

(2)        (a) It is unlawful for any person under the age of twenty-one years to possess, consume, or otherwise acquire any liquor. A violation of this subsection is a gross misdemeanor punishable as provided for in chapter 9A.20 RCW.

    (b) It is unlawful for a person under the age of twenty-one years to be in a public place, or to be in a motor vehicle in a public place, while exhibiting the effects of having consumed liquor. For purposes of this subsection, exhibiting the effects of having consumed liquor means that a person has the odor of liquor on his or her breath and either: (i) Is in possession of or close proximity to a container that has or recently had liquor in it; or (ii) by speech, manner, appearance, behavior, lack of coordination, or otherwise, exhibits that he or she is under the influence of liquor. This subsection (2)(b) does not apply if the person is in the presence of a parent or guardian or has consumed or is consuming liquor under circumstances described in subsection (4) or (5) of this section.

(3) Subsections (1) and (2)(a) of this section do not apply to liquor given or permitted to be given to a person under the age of twenty-one years by a parent or guardian and consumed in the presence of the parent or guardian. This subsection shall not authorize consumption or possession of liquor by a person under the age of twenty-one years on any premises licensed under chapter 66.24 RCW.

 (4) This section does not apply to liquor given for medicinal purposes to a person under the age of twenty-one years by a parent, guardian, physician, or dentist.

 (5) This section does not apply to liquor given to a person under the age of twenty-one years when such liquor is being used in connection with religious services and the amount consumed is the minimal amount necessary for the religious service.

 (6) Conviction or forfeiture of bail for a violation of this section by a person under the age of twenty-one years at the time of such conviction or forfeiture shall not be a disqualification of that person to acquire a license to sell or dispense any liquor after that person has attained the age of twenty-one years

Drivers under the Influence of Alcohol or Drugs

RCW 46.61.502

(1)           A person is guilty of driving while under the influence of intoxicating liquor or any drug if the person drives a vehicle within this state:

     (a) And the person has, within two hours after driving, an alcohol concentration of 0.08 or higher as shown by analysis of the person's breath or blood made under RCW 46.61.506; or

     (b) While the person is under the influence of or affected by intoxicating liquor or any drug; or

     (c) While the person is under the combined influence of or affected by intoxicating liquor and any drug.

(2)           The fact that a person charged with a violation of this section is or has been entitled to use a drug under the laws of this state shall not constitute a defense against a charge of violating this section.

(3)           It is an affirmative defense to a violation of subsection (1)(a) of this section which the defendant must prove by a preponderance of the evidence that the defendant consumed a sufficient quantity of alcohol after the time of driving and before the administration of an analysis of the person's breath or blood to cause the defendant's alcohol concentration to be 0.08 or more within two hours after driving. The court shall not admit evidence of this defense unless the defendant notifies the prosecution prior to the omnibus or pretrial hearing in the case of the defendant's intent to assert the affirmative defense.

(4)           Analyses of blood or breath samples obtained more than two hours after the alleged driving may be used as evidence that within two hours of the alleged driving, a person had an alcohol concentration of 0.08 or more in violation of subsection (1)(a) of this section, and in any case in which the analysis shows an alcohol concentration above 0.00 may be used as evidence that a person was under the influence of or affected by intoxicating liquor or any drug in violation of subsection (1)(b) or (c) of this section.

(5)           Except as provided in subsection (6) of this section, a violation of this section is a gross misdemeanor.

(6)           It is a class C felony punishable under chapter 9.94A RCW, or chapter 13.40 RCW if the person is a juvenile, if: (a) The person has four or more prior offenses within ten years as defined in RCW 46.61.5055; or (b) the person has ever previously been convicted of (i) vehicular homicide while under the influence of intoxicating liquor or any drug, RCW 46.61.520(1)(a), (ii) vehicular assault while under the influence of intoxicating liquor or any drug, RCW 46.61.522(1)(b), or (iii) an out-of-state offense comparable to the offense specified in (b)(i) or (ii) of this subsection.

Washington State Crimes and Penalties — Drugs

Possession of a controlled substance

RCW 69.50.4013

(1)           It is unlawful for any person to possess a controlled substance unless the substance was obtained directly from, or pursuant to, a valid prescription or order of a practitioner while acting in the course of his or her professional practice, or except as otherwise authorized by this chapter.

(2)           Except as provided in RCW 69.50.4014, any person who violates this section is guilty of a class C felony punishable under chapter 9A.20 RCW.

Delivery of substance in lieu of controlled substance

RCW 69.50.40.12

(1)           It is unlawful, except as authorized in this chapter and chapter 69.41 RCW, for any person to offer, arrange, or negotiate for the sale, gift, delivery, dispensing, distribution, or administration of a controlled substance to any person and then sell, give, deliver, dispense, distribute, or administer to that person any other liquid, substance, or material in lieu of such controlled substance.

(2)           Any person who violates this section is guilty of a class C felony punishable according to chapter 9A.20 RCW.

Federal Drug and Crimes and Penalties

Federal law of controlled substances prohibits possession, use, distribution, manufacture or dispensing. Federal sanctions for drug felonies may include: Ultimate punishment for drug crimes generally depends on the quantity, classification, and purpose of possession of the drug. The most serious drug crimes are producing, manufacturing, or selling illegal drugs.

Federal Drug Possession Penalties

  • First violation, a minimum fine of $1,000 but not more than $100,000 and a maximum jail term of one year.
  • Second violation, a minimum fine of $2,500 but not more than $250,000 and/or minimum jail term of 15 days, but not more than two years.
  • Third or subsequent violation, a minimum fine of $5,000 but not more than $250,000 and/or a minimum jail term of 90 days, but not more than three years.
  • Federal penalties have special sentencing provisions for the possession of crack cocaine: a maximum fine of $250,000 and/or a minimum five-year jail term, but not more than 20 years if it is a first conviction and the amount of crack cocaine possessed exceeds 5 grams; second crack cocaine conviction, and the amount possessed exceeds 3 grams; third conviction and the amount possessed exceeds 1 gram.

Federal Drug Trafficking Penalties

Updated information about federal drug trafficking penalties for most drugs can be found at:

www.usdoj.gov/dea/agency/penalties.htm

Campus Safety and Security maintains a close relationship with the Tacoma Police Department to ensure it is notified of crimes that have occurred on or near University of Washington Tacoma campus and non-campus property, public property and student housing which were reported directly to them.

Criminal Homicide

Murder is the willful (non-negligent) killing of one human being by another.

The state of Washington defines it in the following RCWs:

1.              RCW 9A.32.050 Murder in the second degree: apps.leg.wa.gov/rcw/default.aspx?cite=9A.32.050

3. RCW 10.95 Aggravated first degree murder:  http://apps.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=10.95.020

Sex Offenses - Rape

Any sexual act directed against another person, forcibly and/or against that person’s will; or not forcibly or against the person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent:

  • Forcible compulsion: means physical force which overcomes resistance, or a threat, express or implied, that places a person in fear of death or physical injury to herself or himself or another person, or in fear that she or he or another person will be kidnapped.
  • Mental incapacity: is the condition existing at the time of the offense which prevents a person from understanding the nature or consequences of the act of sexual intercourse whether that condition is produced by illness, defect, and the influence of a substance or from some other cause.
  • Physically helpless: is a person who is unconscious or for any other reason is physically unable to communicate unwillingness to an act.
  • Sexual assault with an object: is the use of an object or instrument to unlawfully penetrate, any amount of the vagina or anus however slight, by an object, when committed on one person by another, whether such persons are of the same or opposite sex, except when such penetration is accomplished for medically recognized treatment or diagnostic purposes.
  • Rape: For details on the different versions of this law, please review this information: apps.leg.wa.gov/rcw/default.aspx?cite=9A.44

Non-Forcible Sex Offenses

Other Crimes

  • Robbery: A person commits robbery when he unlawfully takes personal property from the person of another or in his presence against his will by the use or threatened use of immediate force, violence, or fear of injury to that person or his property or the person or property of anyone. Such force or fear must be used to obtain or retain possession of the property, or to prevent or overcome resistance to the taking; in either of which cases the degree of force is immaterial. Such taking constitutes robbery whenever it appears that, although the taking was fully completed without the knowledge of the person from whom taken, such knowledge was prevented by the use of force or fear.
  • Aggravated Assault:  Any assault resulting in physical injury and requiring medical care.
  • Motor Vehicle Theft: The theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle is a Class B felony in the state of Washington. "Motor vehicle" means every vehicle that is self-propelled and every vehicle that is propelled by electric power obtained from overhead trolley wires, but not operated upon rails. "Motor vehicle" includes a neighborhood electric vehicle as defined in RCW 46.04.357. "Motor vehicle" includes a medium-speed electric vehicle as defined in RCW 46.04.295. An electric personal assistive mobility device is not considered a motor vehicle. A power wheelchair is not considered a motor vehicle
  • Arson: Any willful or malicious burning or attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house, public building, motor vehicle or aircraft, personal property of another, etc.
  • Negligent Manslaughter: The killing of another person through gross negligence.
  • Hate Crimes: Any of the aforementioned offenses and any other crime involving bodily injury reported to local police agencies or to a campus security authority that manifests evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the perpetrator’s bias.
  • Domestic Violence: (a) Physical harm, bodily injury, assault, or the infliction of fear of imminent physical harm, bodily injury or assault, between family or household members; (b) sexual assault of one family or household member by another; or (c) stalking as defined in RCW 9A.46.110 of one family or household member by another family or household member.

Stalking/Dating Violence/Domestic Violence

  • Starting with the 2014 Annual Security Report, the Department of Education asked institutions to make their “best efforts” to include statistics for these new crime categories. The Washington State Criminal Code does not contain a separate crime of “domestic violence” or “dating violence.”  Instead, crimes relating to domestic violence and dating violence are covered by other provisions of the criminal code, such as “Sexual Offenses” or “Assault” crimes.  The law is gender neutral and recognizes that domestic violence occurs between members of the same or opposite sex
  • Dating Violence: is controlling, abusive, and aggressive behavior in a romantic relationship
  • Domestic Violence:
    (a) Physical harm, bodily injury, assault, or the infliction of fear of imminent physical harm, bodily injury or assault, between family or household members;
    (b) sexual assault of one family or household member by another; or
    (c) stalking as defined in RCW 9A.46.110 of one family or household member by another family or household member.
  • Stalking: Stalking is unwanted, repeated and continuing contact — either in person or online which directly or indirectly causes a person to feel threatened, harassed or intimidated. Under Washington state law, stalking and cyberstalking are considered crimes.

Other Offenses

  • Liquor Law Violations: The violation of laws or ordinances prohibiting: the manufacture, sale, transporting, furnishing, possessing of intoxicating liquor; maintaining unlawful drinking places; bootlegging; operating a still; furnishing liquor to a minor or intemperate person; using a vehicle for illegal transportation of liquor; drinking on a train or public conveyance; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned. (Drunkenness and driving under the influence are not included in this definition.)
  • Drug Law Violations: These are violations of federal, state and local laws relating to the unlawful possession, sale, use, growing, manufacturing, and making of narcotic drugs. The relevant substances include opium or cocaine and their derivatives (morphine, heroin, codeine); marijuana; synthetic narcotics (Demerol, methadone); and dangerous non-narcotic drugs (barbiturates, Benzedrine).
  • Illegal Weapons Possession: The violation of laws or ordinances dealing with weapon offenses, regulatory in nature, such as: manufacture, sale, or possession of deadly weapons; carrying deadly weapons, concealed or openly; furnishing deadly weapons to minors; aliens possessing deadly weapons; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned.

Crime Statistics

Criminal Offences

Criminal Offenses:

Year

On- Campus

Student Housing

Non- Campus

Public Areas

Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter

2014

2015

2016

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Negligent manslaughter

2014

2015

2016

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 Sex offenses – Forcible

2014

2015

2016

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Sex offenses –

Non-forcible (include only incest and statutory rape)

2014

2015

2016

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

Robbery

2014

2015

2016

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

Aggravated assault

2014

2015

2016

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

4

Burglary

2014

2015

2016

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

Motor vehicle theft

2014

2015

2016

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

5

0

9

Arson

2014

2015

2016

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

Stalking

2014

2015

2016

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Dating Violence

2014

2015

2016

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

2

Domestic Violence

2014

2015

2016

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

Hate Crime Offences

Criminal Offenses:

Year

On Campus

Student Housing

Non-Campus

Public Property

a. Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter

2014

2015

2016

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

b. Negligent manslaughter

2014

2015

2016

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

c. Sex offenses – Forcible

2014

2015

2016

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

d. Sex offenses – Non-forcible (include only incest and statutory rape)

2014

2015

2016

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

e. Robbery

2014

2015

2016

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

f. Aggravated assault

2014

2015

2016

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

g. Burglary

2014

2015

2016

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

h. Motor vehicle theft

2014

2015

2016

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

i.  Arson

2014

2015

2016

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

j. Simple assault

2014

2015

2016

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

k. Larceny-theft

2014

2015

2016

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

l. Intimidation

2014

2015

2016

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

m. Destruction/damage/ vandalism of property

2014

2015

2016

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Note: In accordance with the U.S. Department of Education’s Handbook for Campus Crime Reporting, Public Property is defined as thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, and parking facilities within the campus, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus.

 

Crimes that Resulted in an Arrest or Referral for Disciplinary Action

Arrests:

Year

On- Campus

Student Housing

Non-Campus

Public Property

Illegal weapons possession

2014

2015

2016

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

Drug law violations

2014

2015

2016

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

Liquor law violations

2014

2015

2016

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

Disciplinary Actions/Judicial Referrals:

Year

On-Campus

Student

Housing

Non-Campus

Public Property

Illegal weapons possession

2014

2015

2016

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Drug law violations

2014

2015

2016

0

5

0

0

5

5

0

0

0

0

0

0

Liquor law violations

2014

2015

2016

0

11

11

0

11

11

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

Fire Statistics for On Campus- Student Housing Facilities

Fires - On-campus Student Housing Facilities (Operated by third party until 9/1/2016)

2014

2015

2016

Fires

0

0

0

Injuries

0

0

0

Death

0

0

0

Note: In accordance with the U.S. Department of Education’s Handbook for Campus Crime Reporting, Public Property is defined as thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, and parking facilities within the campus, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus.

 

University of Washington Tacoma Campus Map

Campus Safety Map

 

University of Washington Tacoma provides equal opportunity for all qualified persons in its educational programs and activities. The university does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital status, personal appearance, sexual orientation, family responsibilities, political affiliation, and source of income, veteran status or physical handicap. The policy of equal opportunity applies to every aspect of the operations and activities of the university generally, and includes admissions and employment.

 

Campus Safety and Security

Campus Box 358452
1900 Commerce Street
Tacoma, WA 98402-3100

An equal opportunity/affirmative action university