Implementation Science

Implementation Science

Fixsen, Naoom, Blasé, Friedman, and Wallace (2005) define implementation as “a specified set of activities designed to put into practice an activity or program of known dimensions.” The starting point for training activities is using Implementation Science to drive sustainable change. The five main stages of successful implementation from the National Implementation Research Network (NIRN): 1) Exploration (i.e., selecting evidence-based programs); 2) Installation (i.e., making the structural and instrumental changes necessary to implement the program within an organization); 3) Initial Implementation (i.e., putting into practice all that has been planned for during exploration and installation); 4) Full Implementation (i.e., integrating the program into the service, organization, and system settings); and, 5) Program Sustainability (i.e., institutionalizing a quality assurance mechanism to evaluate use of data and nurture organizational culture, leadership, and staff).

According to Implementation Science, unless there is effective implementation of effective interventions in enabling contexts, the evidence-based practice will not translate to positive student outcomes (Fixsen, 2014). At each level (i.e., state, district, building), teams use what we know about Implementation Science (i.e., teams, drivers, cycles, and stages) to develop capacity, leadership, and competency for systems at all levels, in a simultaneous manner, to create the system change necessary to achieve positive outcomes for all students.