Internships

Pierce County IT Mobile App Development

The Institute of Technology Internship Program promotes opportunities for students to receive academic credit for degree-related, paid or non-paid work experience for students who have completed the core course requirements.

Up to 5 credits per quarter and a total of 10 credits may count towards an Institute degree. You must complete the core coursework before starting a degree-related work experience in a paid or unpaid internship.

Open to current Computer Science and Systems (CSS), Computer Engineering and Systems (CES), and Information Technology (IT)* students who have completed the entire core sequence are eligible for internship. 

*Note: An internship is required for IT students but not for the CSS or CES majors.

Resources
 

Suggested Options for Internship

  • Option 1: Conventional Internship

Students can choose from special projects proposed by any potential sponsor. The Program Office will keep a list of current proposals. These have potential for development into internships. They will be subject to specific conditions as specified or negotiated by the sponsor and the CSS program. Each project must demonstrate academic merit for the student and fit within her/his program objectives. They require approvals from a faculty advisor, the employer (the Internship sponsor), and CSS program, and must meet evaluation guidelines as defined in the Internship Contract.

  • Option 2: CSS Affiliate Internship

The CSS Program Office maintains a listing of CSS Affiliates who are regular Internship sponsors, with company information, and active projects. A student may select one of these projects and follow any application process specified. Each project must demonstrate academic merit for the student and fit within her/his program objectives. These competitive positions are subject to specific conditions as specified by the sponsor and the CSS program. This requires approvals from a faculty advisor, the employer (the Internship sponsor), and CSS program, and must meet evaluation guidelines as defined in the Internship Contract.

  • Option 3: Current Employer Internship

Employed students may select to apply for an Internship with their present employer. Each project must demonstrate academic merit for the student and fit within her/his program objectives. The effort must provide additional benefit to both the student and employer (i.e., the project represents work that is above and beyond what is normally expected by the employer). This requires approvals from a faculty advisor, the employer (the Internship sponsor), and CSS program, and must meet evaluation guidelines as defined in the Internship Contract.

  • Option 4: Sponsor Established Internship

Students may apply for an established Internship program with a participating company or organization through the standard application process for that institution. Many of these opportunities are listed in the UWT Career Counseling Center. Each project must demonstrate academic merit for the student and fit within her/his program objectives. This requires approvals from a faculty advisor, the employer (the Internship sponsor), and CSS program, and must meet evaluation guidelines as defined in the Internship Contract.

  • Option 5: Faculty Research Internship

A student may work with a faculty member on a research project that has significant implications for industry and/or the community. Each project must demonstrate academic merit for the student and fit within her/his program objectives. At least one external Internship sponsor and/or granting agency should be identified as a reviewer of the work to be completed. This requires approvals from a faculty advisor, the reviewer, and CSS program, and must meet evaluation guidelines as defined in the Internship Contract.

  • Option 6: Individual Project Student Defined

A student may identify a computing project that she or he feels meets a need of industry and/or the community. The student must identify at least one potential customer (such as, an Internship sponsor) who will agree to review the project and sign the Internship Contract Agreement. Once this user has been identified, the student must use appropriate software development methodologies to meet deliverable requirements. The student must present the project to the customers and the faculty advisor for final evaluation.

  • Option 7: Group Project Student Defined

A group of students may identify a project that meets the requirements specified in Option 6, above. This project, however, must be more complex in nature and have sufficient academic and practical workload. A detailed project specification and project plan including individual responsibilities and team milestones must accompany your proposal for approval.

Completing an Internship

STEP

ACTION

  1. Identify a faculty advisor

You should first consult Andrew Fry, Assistant Director of Industry Partnerships for a list of current faculty who are available for internship advising. Ideally, the faculty member selected should be one who is familiar with you and is willing to nominate you for this project.

  1. Complete the Internship form for the program you are enrolled.

It is advisable to complete the contract in consultation with the Andrew Fry to ensure that it meets all requirements.

  1. Read the assumptions about participation

 

  1. Present completed form to Andrew Fry, Assistant Director of Industry Partnerships

You must submit the completed and signed internship form to Andrew Fry. Evaluation criteria will be reviewed to ensure you meet program competency requirements.

  1. Enroll in TCSS, TCES, or TINFO 497

Once approval is granted, you will receive an entry code to enroll. You can earn between 1 and 5 credits per quarter. Each individual credit requires 4 hours per week of effort on the project for a 10-week period (e.g., earning 5 credits requires 20 hours of effort on the project for a ten-week period — a total of 200 hours).

  1. Completing TCSS, TCES, or TINFO 497

 

Please review faculty syllabus.

  1. Prepare quarterly status report and final report

This is outlined in more detail within the syllabus.

  1. Present final project at the end of the year colloquium

In order to have completed the requirements for TCSS, TCES, or TINFO 497, you must present your work at the end of the quarter colloquium. Colloquia will be scheduled each quarter as needed.

  1. Receive final evaluation and grade

The faculty advisor will evaluate the final project and determine the grade according to the criteria agreed on in your internship proposal. The grade will take into account the quality of your report and presentation.

Internship Application Documents

How to find Internships

Finding internships is like every other job hunt. You are actively searching for an internship that best suits you. This entails developing your resume and cover letter. They should be tailored to each internship you apply for. Be prepared to provide references, letters of recommendation, and to send out thank you notes and follow up after the interview. Having an effective resume and cover letter are key to getting an interview.

Students should not be discouraged with their lack of work experience. As a student, you should highlight your academic accomplishments. Examples of accomplishments could be a project that demonstrated your ability to use tools and software learned in the classroom or highlight your leadership skills that demonstrate your ability to manage, organize, motivate and represent your group.

Internships offer employers a chance to involve students in professional design, implementation and research projects. Many employers view internships as a way to discover qualified, experienced employees.

Resume Workshop - http://www.tacoma.washington.edu/studentaffairs/SS/cde_resumes.cfm

If you need help getting started, please visit Career Development on campus located at:
Mattress Factory (MAT) 106
253-692-4421
tcareer@uw.edu

What are the requirements

Students interested in receiving credit for internships must complete the core requirements for their program. The course strives to develop opportunities for degree-related, work experiences for all Institute students. Please review curriculum requirements:

Computer Engineering and Systems
Computer Science and Systems
Information Technology

What are the expectations

The student agrees to perform to the best of their abilities and to the satisfaction of the internship sponsor(s) - those assigned tasks related to the agreed upon contract. Students will have the opportunity to complete all deliverables as described in the project plan and to present their findings at the end of the quarter colloquium and prepare a final report.

How are you graded

A faculty sponsor, a sponsoring organization professional mentor, and the student will form the internship team and together they develop the detailed project plan. The plan must clearly identify the learning objectives and the program competencies that are further developed through participation in the internship. The student will write a formal report detailing his/her project and their accomplishments. The report and an evaluation by the faculty sponsor and the senior professional mentor will determine the grade for the internship. This report will be a public document.

The grading criteria will be outlined in the syllabus. The faculty sponsor will evaluate the final project and determine the grade according to the criteria agreed on in the internship proposal. The grade criteria will include the quality of the report and the presentation.

Students will need to turn in a Title, Abstract, and Company Sponsor information (including contact information for post internship surveys) in the eighth week of the quarter. This is essential for use at the end of the quarter colloquium.

NOTE: A copy of the final report must be included in the student’s file. A copy will also be made available for anyone who requests it. It is essentially a public document.

End of the year colloquium and Poster Sessions

During the end of the quarter colloquium, students do short presentations in regards to their internship, directed reading or research.

Presentations are ten minutes in length for individual project or twenty minutes when involving two or more students. Each presentation is followed by five minutes of questions and answers, often while the next presenter is setting up. Graduate students may be asked to do a fifteen minute update and up to a one hour defense.

The student may choose their presentation approach, though normally, Powerpoint or Prezi is used as the presentation tool.

Often, five slides, including an introductory slide with student name and project title, three slides of information, and a question and answer slide are enough to cover the ten minute allotment.

Students are given one of several presentation session time slots. Students arrive before the start of their session and sign up for order of presentation. Each student stays a minimum of one presentation after their own.

During the Winter colloquium and on special occasions, poster sessions are added.

Poster Session Information

A poster presentation is a visual communication tool that gets the presenter's main point across to as many people as possible. It also helps the presenter engage in conversation with colleagues or fellow-students about their work. A poster can be a big piece of poster paper, a trifold presentation board or a laptop with a running slide show of a few slides that can communicate your research and is composed of:

- a short title
- an introduction to your project or internship
- an overview of your approach and the technology you used
- the results of your work, (often in screen shot format or graphical representation)
- conclusions drawn from those results
- an acknowledgement of your faculty and industry sponsors

By keeping it as concise as possible, you should be able to hit all the major points and cover your experience in ten minutes or less.

At the end of the quarter colloquium there may be an opportunity to participate in poster sessions with your fellow students. In particular, these sessions run concurrently with the South Sound Technology Conference, giving students the opportunity to meet and discuss their projects with members of industry and government officials as well as academic attendees. These sessions run in the morning and the afternoon for two hours and participants are assigned to one or the other. Students with two projects will attend both.

Poster sessions are utilized by a faculty sponsor as part of the grading process for the student coursework. Grading rubrics are determined by the faculty sponsor.

Thanks to the Michigan State page on poster sessions - http://fod.msu.edu/oir/poster-presentations

Also, thanks to Penn State University reference guidelines - http://www.writing.engr.psu.edu/posters.html