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Learning Lushootseed at UW təqʷuʔbəʔ

Learning Lushootseed at UW təqʷuʔbəʔ

How do you spell Tacoma in Lushootseed?

təqʷuʔbəʔ

At the Lushootseed Language Institute—a collaboration between UW Tacoma, the UW Tacoma Professional Development Center and the Puyallup Tribe of Indians—students learn a language by learning to speak of things important in their daily lives, like where they live, or common items in their home or the store.

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about the Institute and its mission.

(Note about təqʷuʔbəʔ: Several sources say təqʷuʔbəʔ, which has been translated as "mother of waters," was what local Lushootseed speakers called the mountain many today call Mt. Rainier. It has been variously transliterated into English as Tacoma, Tahoma, Talol, Takobah and others. More information is available on Lushootseed names of Coast Salish villages located in or near what is now Tacoma.)

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Grounded learning

Grounded Learning

What goes around, comes around. The Lushootseed Language Institute—a two-week intensive immersion in the language and culture of the Coast Salish peoples from Skagit to Nisqually, including the Puyallup people—happens on the UW Tacoma campus, itself located on land that traditionally belongs to the Puyallup Tribe.

After many decades of incursions, marked by encumbrances such as the 1854 Treaty of Medicine Creek, the 1990 Puyallup Land Claims Settlement began a new era of collaboration between tribe and town. The Puyallup Tribe’s grant of $275,000 to UW Tacoma in 2015 supports the development of the Language Institute, now in its second year.

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Lushootseed Everywhere #1

Where else can you see Lushootseed?

On the UW Tacoma Peace Pole

On the grand staircase in front of the Keystone building (map), a Peace Pole, planted in 2010, carries a message of peace in four languages, including Lushootseed.

In Lushootseed, it says: miʔ qmqmemúle ʔxʷm

In English, it says: "May Peace Prevail on Earth"

On the Gig Harbor Peace Pole

A Peace Pole placed in Gig Harbor in 2016 says, in Lushootseed:
gʷəƛʼəliləxʷ ti swatixʷtəd bəkʼʷ dxʷčad

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What Does a Language Class Sound Like?

What Does a Language Class Sound Like?

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Lushootseed Everywhere #2

Where else can you see Lushootseed?

On a UW campus building in Seattle

wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ–Intellectual House opened in 2015, providing a learning and gathering space for American Indian and Alaska Native students, faculty and staff.

The building—a longhouse-style facility holding 600—and an outdoor gathering circle make up phase one of a project that will eventually include a building for teaching and learning.

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Kayla Guyett: "Student forever"

Kayla Guyett: “Student Forever”

Kayla Guyett describes herself as a “student forever.” Last summer she attended the inaugural Lushootseed Language Institute at UW Tacoma.

“It was a life-changing experience. Being surrounded by a bigger movement and people who care about what you care about changes a little part of you.”

Not long after, members of the Puyallup Tribe reached out to Guyett and offered her a position at Chief Leschi Schools. She now works as a culture teacher for the elementary classrooms.

Not surprisingly, Guyett signed up for this year's Institute.

Read more about how Kayla immerses herself and her students in the language with a focus on the everyday.

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Learning by Singing

Learning by Singing

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Lushootseed Everywhere #3

Where else can you see Lushootseed?

On a bus.

King County 4Culture's "Poetry on Buses" 2017 program features this poem by Billy (Willy) Frank Sr.

ƛʼalʼ tiiɫ bəkʼʷ ʔəsqʼʷuʔ ʔəsx̌ʷulʼab gʷəsqaləkʷ gʷəɫ tiiɫ ʔaciɫtalbixʷ bəkʼʷ stab, bəkʼʷ ʔaciɫtalbixʷ, bəkʼʷ diləɫ
(English: We live in harmony within the circle of life, with all natural things, with our community, and with ourselves.)

Listen to Muckleshoot member Mary Ross speak the poem.
Learn more about the Poetry on Buses program.

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Irene McCloud: "Keep Speaking"

Irene McCloud: "Keep Speaking"

Irene McCloud is a member of the Puyallup Tribe but has strong connections to the Nisqually: she works for the Nisqually Indian Tribe's Early Head Start Program.

Before the summer Lushootseed immersion class, she'd never taken a language course before. But the instructors are very reassuring. "If you mess up, they encourage you to keep speaking."

Now, McCloud's family is eager for her to complete the program. "They want me to teach them," she said.

Read more about how Irene plans to take the sounds of her ancestors back to her school kids.

 

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Lushootseed Everywhere #4

Where else can you see Lushootseed?

On your smartphone

The Puyallup Tribe has released four free iOS apps on the Lushootseed language (called Twulshootseed in the Apple iTunes store).

Twulshootseed Alphabet - learn the characters and sounds of the alphabet.
Twulshootseed What is That? - a game to teach spelling using the names of animals.
Texting Twulshootseed - simplifies the process of text-messaging to other iOS devices
Twulshootseed 75 Words - visual and audio reference to 15 words in each of five categories

Learn more about Lushootseed from the Puyallup Tribe Language Program.

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Lushootseed: What's Next?

What's Next?

Lushootseed Language Institute logoPlanning is in the works for the next Lushootseed Language Institute. You can add your name to an interest list by visiting the UW Tacoma Professional Development Center.

 

Puyallup Tribal Language Program logoVisit the Puyallup Tribal Language Program for more news, resources and links about Lushootseed.

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