American Studies

American Studies considers what it means to be “American” by evaluating the ideals and realities of life in the United States. Explore the ways our national and cultural identities are produced through a variety of issues and experiences, including the influences of class, ethnicity, gender and race.

Our coursework examines:
  • The norms and stories that shape American life and identity
  • The intersection of history and popular culture through literature, sociology, philosophy, art, anthropology, geography and the environment.

Increase your understanding of American systems, American lives and American spaces through investigations, discussions, creative work and community-engaged projects.

Changes in the American Studies curriculum

For more information, contact advisor Susan Morreira, the American Studies faculty, or the American Studies major coordinator, Associate Professor Ingrid Walker.

American Studies student learning outcomes

Students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the historical development of American cultures, nationhood and social movements in various social and political contexts
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how cultural meaning is created, and how studying cultural ideas and practices can provide us with multiple ways of making power visible
  • Situate American cultures and communities within a global context
  • Analyze and synthesize material from primary and secondary sources in order to create a coherent, evidence-based argument
  • Employ methodologies from the humanities and the social sciences to analyze a variety of historical, cultural, social and political questions.

American Studies career options

As an interdisciplinary major, American Studies offers students flexibility and choice in a variety of subjects, disciplinary approaches and skills. Graduates are prepared for a broad range of careers in areas such as education, journalism, law, medicine, public relations, law enforcement, social work, business, community organizing, non-profit administration, museum curatorship, urban and environmental planning, library science and government.

American Studies degree requirements

Students take a total of 65 credits: 35 credits in American Studies Foundation courses and 30 credits in the Areas of Focus. Foundational courses lay the groundwork for a social, political and historical understanding of the United States’ cultural development. The “American Culture and Perspectives,” “AM Topics” and “AM Capstone” courses focus on American Studies' concepts and methodologies and draw on the interdisciplinary strengths of the American Studies faculty to examine the American past and present using a range of methods and subjects.

American Studies course lists beginning winter 2017

Total: 65 credits

Of the 65 credits in the major, students must take one course that meets the Ethnicity/Race subject matter requirement. This may be taken within the credits of Areas of Focus or elsewhere in the major.

Foundation Courses: 35 credits

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Areas of Focus: 30 credits

American Studies students have access to broad-ranging curriculum and the opportunity to concentrate their study in one of the three designated areas. Courses that offer an exploration into American political and economic thought, American philosophic traditions and United States legal institutions are housed in American Systems & Experiments (List A). The myriad ways in which individual and community experiences are expressed in art, literature and popular culture are explored in the contingent of courses titled American Lives (List B). Courses selected for American Spaces (List C) reflect either a geographical or a metaphorical exploration of the political, cultural economic or environmental terrain. Because courses are drawn from a variety of disciplines and cover a wide range of material, some courses straddle two lists, and students are welcome to use a course for either requirement. With the exception of courses that meet the Ethnicity/Race requirement, a single course cannot meet multiple requirements.

Students take six (6) Areas of Focus courses; two (2) from each list.

  • List A: American Systems & Experiments
    • (Political thought, systems of belief and philosophy and economy, and legal institutions as social experiments in the U.S.)
       
  • List B: American Lives
    • (Individual and community experience and its expression in art, literature, popular culture and other areas)
       
  • List C: American Spaces
    • (Geography, environments: urban, suburban, rural, natural, Inter-American or the U.S. in international contexts)

Of the 65 credits in the major, students must take one course that meets the Ethnicity/Race subject matter requirement. This may be taken within the credits of Areas of Focus or elsewhere in the major.

List A: American Systems & Experiments

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List B: American Lives

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List C: American Spaces

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Ethnicity/Race Requirement

In addition to TAMST 210, students in American Studies are required to take at least one course within the requirements of the major that focuses on how ethnicity and race have been fundamental to the development of American culture. Courses that fulfill this requirement are noted on the list below.

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American Studies course lists prior to winter 2017

Total: 65 credits

Of the 65 credits in the major, students must take one course that meets the Ethnicity/Race subject matter requirement. This may be taken within the credits of Areas of Focus or elsewhere in the major.

Required Course

Students should take TAMST 210 American Culture and Perspectives: Class, Ethnicity, Gender and Race prior to upper level coursework, particularly the American Studies Topics courses.

Foundation Courses: 35 credits

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Areas of Focus: 30 credits

American Studies students have access to broad-ranging curriculum and the opportunity to concentrate their study in one of the three designated areas. Courses that offer an exploration into American political and economic thought, American philosophic traditions and United States legal institutions are housed in American Systems & Experiments (List A). The myriad ways in which individual and community experiences are expressed in art, literature and popular culture are explored in the contingent of courses titled American Lives (List B). Courses selected for American Spaces (List C) reflect either a geographical or a metaphorical exploration of the political, cultural economic or environmental terrain. Because courses are drawn from a variety of disciplines and cover a wide range of material, some courses straddle two lists, and students are welcome to use a course for either requirement. With the exception of courses that meet the Ethnicity/Race requirement, a single course cannot meet multiple requirements.

Students take six (6) Areas of Focus courses; two (2) from each list.

  • List A: American Systems & Experiments
    • (Political thought, systems of belief and philosophy and economy, and legal institutions as social experiments in the U.S.)
       
  • List B: American Lives
    • (Individual and community experience and its expression in art, literature, popular culture and other areas)
       
  • List C: American Spaces
    • (Geography, environments: urban, suburban, rural, natural, Inter-American or the U.S. in international contexts)

Of the 65 credits in the major, students must take one course that meets the Ethnicity/Race subject matter requirement. This may be taken within the credits of Areas of Focus or elsewhere in the major.

List A: American Systems & Experiments

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List B: American Lives

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List C: American Spaces

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Ethnicity/Race Requirement

In addition to TAMST 210, students in American Studies are required to take at least one course within the requirements of the major that focuses on how ethnicity and race have been fundamental to the development of American culture. Courses that fulfill this requirement are noted on the list below.

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 Additional courses may be approved and added to courses lists to provide students more flexibility and options.
Please refer to this page often for the most up-to-date information.

To request changes to this page, please contact Kelly Kledzik at kellyk6@uw.edu.