Mexico

Learn Spanish in the heart of Mexico this summer through UW Tacoma's language immersion program in Cuernacava, Mexico, starting June 12. The program, which is open to undergraduate and graduate students from any UW campus, offers Spanish language classes at all levels, promoting conversational language skills while exposing students to Mexican culture and traditions. The priority application date is March 21.

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Meridith Hatch (IAS '10) is spending five weeks in Cuernavaca, Mexico, as part of a UW Tacoma Spanish language immersion program.

I first learned of Juan Ruiz de Alarcón while on a guided tour of the Santa Prisca Cathedral in the city of Taxco. As we were viewing a series of portraits painted by Miguel Cabrera, our guide explained how one portrait featured Ruiz de Alarcón, a poet and one of the earliest prominent writers in Mexican history.

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Meridith Hatch (IAS '10) is spending five weeks in Cuernavaca, Mexico, as part of a UW Tacoma Spanish language immersion program..

On our trip into Mexico City last weekend our guide mentioned we would be learning about xoloitzcuintli (pronounced soloit-squint-le) at the Dolores Olmedo Museum. Until we got there I had no idea what the heck a xoloitzcuintli was. Turns out, it's a dog - a hairless dog, to be precise.

We first saw them as we passed the converted chapel that serves as the main museum, which features the work of famed artist Diego Rivera. Next to this is the building that served as Dolores Olmedo's home on the hacienda she purchased in the 60's. Dozens of peacocks and peahens with chicks freely roam the grounds, and until we saw the dogs (okay, and the museums), they were the main event.

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Meridith Hatch (IAS '10) is spending five weeks in Cuernavaca, Mexico, as part of a UW Tacoma Spanish language immersion program..

We've been studying the culture and civilizations of Mexico and Meso-America in our grammar class. Our instructor, Lorena, mentioned that the Aztecs used the bark of the amate tree as an early form of paper. She mentioned our interest in amate to our conversation instructor, Rufi. He asked if we wanted to see an amate tree, and off we went on an impromptu excursion to Barranca de Amanalco, or Amanalco Gully.

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Meridith Hatch (IAS '10) is spending five weeks in Cuernavaca, Mexico, as part of a UW Tacoma Spanish language immersion program. Look for more posts from students in the Cuernavaca program soon.

Before coming to Mexico, I didn't realize the how many archaeological treasures could be found here. Teotihuacan is an archaeological site near Mexico City where you can find the Pyramid of the Sun and the Pyramid of the Moon. Built as part of a great city later called Teotihuacan, these pyramids were only part of what was the 6th largest city in the world, back in its hey-day around 200-600 A.D, with an estimated population of 125,000. After the demise of the Teotihuacan civilization, the city was discovered by later civilizations who called it the “City where gods are born”, the translation of “Teotihuacan” from Nahuatl, an indigenous language of Mexico which we're learning about in conversation class. We don't know what the builders of the city called it, or what language they actually spoke. We do know later civilizations such as the Aztecs saw the value of the city and its location and used it as their own.

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Meridith Hatch (IAS '10) is spending five weeks in Cuernavaca, Mexico, as part of a UW Tacoma Spanish language immersion program. Look for more posts from students in the Cuernavaca program soon.

In our conversation class at Kulkucan we made a quick trip down to the mercado, or market. It was crowded, with many things and many people in a small area. I appreciated having our teacher there as a guide to explain what we were seeing as we moved through the different sections.

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Meridith Hatch (IAS '10) is spending five weeks in Cuernavaca, Mexico, as part of a UW Tacoma Spanish language immersion program. Look for more posts from students in the Cuernavaca program soon.

Went to see the Xochicalco (pronounced Sochikallko) archeological site Saturday with a group from Kukulcan. The guide explained that to build the temples the Mixtecas carried the stones on their backs with a strap under the stone and around their foreheads. In order to prevent the high priests on top from seeing their face or their backs (a grave offense), they would walk up the steps sideways. That's why the steps are so high yet shallow. When we tried walking up the next set of stairs sideways it was much easier. Going down was still a little scary; those steps were steep!