2017 Forum

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Panel I: Immigrant contribution to urban revitalization
Video Link Here
This panel focuses on national and regional experiences in immigrant rich areas, primarily on the contributions of immigrants to revitalizing neighborhoods, improving local economies, and enriching the cultural ecology of their adopted homes. We will also look at their collective contribution to the growth of labor, both in professional and service sectors.  Panelists will discuss the experiences of various cities around the country, including the Pacific Northwest. 
Sulja Warnick, Korean Women's Association
Marty Campbell, Tacoma City Council
Felipe Filomena , Assistant Professor Department of Political Science and Program in Global Studies, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
 
Keynote: 
Slide Presentation
Marie Price, George Washington University, Elliot School of International Affairs
 
Panel II: What constitutes a welcoming region?
Video Link Here
Welcoming cities are those that embrace immigrants and create an inclusive environment that provides opportunities for everyone. This panel will focus on the necessity for and growth of welcoming cities and regions in the U.S., particularly in the South Sound, highlighting some of the more interesting locally-created policies that positively shape immigrants’ experience. Relying on national and regional experts, we will highlight efforts in various cities around the nation and ask whether the South Puget Sound can be considered a welcoming region. We will also entertain ideas about additional measures that might contribute to our status as a welcoming region. 
Marilyn Strickland, Mayor, City of Tacoma
Melissa Bertolo, Coordinator of Welcome Dayton
Rich Stoltz, OneAmerica
Liz Dunbar, Tacoma Community House

 

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Sponsored by:


  
 


 

     


BCRA

Conversations Re: Tacoma

Dwyer Pemberton & Coulson P.C.

FLT Properties

Gray Lumber Company

Helix Design Group
Newland Communities
Urban @ UW
 

Keynote Speaker

The Importance of Local Strategies to Attract and Retain Immigrants in U.S. Cities

Marie Price

George Washington University, Elliot School of International Affairs

Marie Price is a Professor of Geography and International Affairs at the George Washington University. A Latin American and migration specialist, her studies have explored human migration’s impact on development and social change.  She is President of the American Geographical Society and a non-resident fellow of the Migration Policy Institute.  Locally, she serves on the Board of the Dream Project, a not-for-profit registered in Virginia that supports undocumented immigrant students through scholarships, mentoring, and advocacy. Her current research is on the spatial dynamics of immigrant inclusion and exclusion.  She is interested in participatory mapping and open source platforms as I way to engage students in research and analysis.

Her publications include co-authored report Migrants’ Inclusion in Cities: Innovative Urban Policies and Practices (2012, United Nations), co-edited book Migrants to the Metropolis: The Rise of Immigrant Gateway Cities (2008, Syracuse University Press), and the co-authored textbooks Diversity Amid Globalization: World Regions, Environment and Development, 7th edition (2017, Pearson) and Globalization and Diversity: Geography of a Changing World, 5th edition (2016, Pearson).  She has published over 50 refereed articles and book chapters.

Panel I


 

Liesl Santkuyl

Coalition Coordinator for
Leaders in Women’s Health

Liesl Santkuyl, is a long-term Tacoma community advocate, public health educator and social justice activist. Currently she is Coalition Coordinator for Leaders in Women’s Health, an initiative of the Northwest Leadership Foundation. Liesl holds a Master of Public Health degree from the University of Wisconsin, specializing in Community Health Education, and has worked as a health educator in migrant health centers, public health, and hospitals in Wisconsin and Washington. Born in Venezuela and a proud Latina and immigrant, she lived in Mexico and Guatemala during her childhood and early twenties and thoroughly enjoys working with our multicultural Tacoma community to ensure that all voices are heard and valued.

 

 

Marty Campbell

Tacoma City Council

Marty Campbell was born in Omaha, NE. He attended the University of Nebraska before coming to Tacoma to open two small businesses. Through his involvement in Tacoma, he became more involved in neighborhood and community issues. He has served in a leadership role for several community organizations, including the Cross District Association, New Tacoma Neighborhood Council, The Grand Cinema, First Creek Neighbors, Dome Top Neighborhood Alliance, TEAM, Downtown Merchant’s Group, City Club of Tacoma and many others.

 

Council Member Marty Campbell was elected to the Tacoma City Council in 2009 and represents Council District 4.

 

 

 

Felipe Filomeno

Assistant Professor Department of Political Science and Program in Global Studies, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
 

Felipe Amin Filomeno is Assistant Professor of Political Science and Global Studies at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. He holds a PhD in Sociology from the Johns Hopkins University, where he was a Fulbright scholar from 2007 to 2012. His current research is about the governance of international migration, with a focus on the urban level. Filomeno was awarded the Early Career Prize of the Economics & Politics Section of the Latin American Studies Association in 2015 and is author of Monsanto and Intellectual Property in South America (Palgrave Macmillan 2014) and of Theories of Local Immigration Policy (Palgrave Macmillan 2017). His publications have also appeared in several academic journals, including the Urban Affairs Review, Comparative Politics, and the Journal of Politics in Latin America.

 

 

 

Liz Dunbar

Executive Director,

Tacoma Community House

(Panel I Moderator)

 

Liz Dunbar began as the Executive Director of Tacoma Community House in April 2009.  She retired in 2006 from the Department of Social and Health Services after 25 years of service. At DSHS, she served in a number of capacities, including State Refugee Coordinator, Diversity Director, Assistant Secretary for Economic Services and lastly as the Deputy Secretary of the department for six years.

 

Liz is active in community affairs as well, serving on the board of trustees for Tacoma Community College, the boards of the LASCO Foundation, Pioneer Human Services and the Japanese American Citizens League.  She is the daughter of a Japanese immigrant and a US Air Force officer.

 

Liz lives in Tacoma with her husband Mike, a financial planner and they have two grown children.

 

 

 

Sulja Warnick,

Korean Women’s Association

 

Sulja Warnick is one of the founding member of the Korean Women’s Association, Tacoma, at which for over forty years have helped to a build this non-profit social service agency, now employing 1,200 people.  Selected accomplishments include teaching at the Tacoma School District for thirty years promoting global education; Served fourteen years on the Governor’s Commission for Asian Pacific Islanders Affairs, who advised the Governor on immigration, education and other social service and economic issues affecting the Asian and Pacific Islander communities in our state; Currently serves on the Boards of Directors of the MultiCare Foundation (Tacoma) and the Foundation for Tacoma Students.

Panel II

 

Marilyn Strickland

Mayor, City of Tacoma
 

Marilyn Strickland is serving her second term as Mayor of Tacoma. Her pro-growth agenda focuses on creating family-wage jobs by improving education and workforce training, promoting entrepreneurship, investing in transportation and attracting international investment. Born in Seoul, she is a graduate of the University of Washington and holds an MBA from Clark-Atlanta University. Prior to elected office, she worked in both the private and public sectors. Mayor Strickland’s regional and national board leadership includes Sound Transit, the U.S. Conference of Mayors and the Democratic Mayors Association. Strickland has appeared on Meet the Press, National Public Radio and is a trustee with the Urban Land Institute. She has been recognized by the National League of Cities Women in Municipal Government for outstanding local leadership and was recognized as the 2015 Washington Trade Hero by the Washington Council on International Trade.


 

Melissa Bertolo,

Welcome Dayton Program Coordinator, City of Dayton Human Relations Council

Melissa Bertolo joined the City of Dayton as Welcome Dayton Program Coordinator in 2012 as the first full time employee to work on the immigrant friendly initiative. As Welcome Dayton Coordinator, Melissa is responsible for facilitating community efforts to improve immigrants’ and refugees’ successful integration into the Dayton community. Her work includes developing cross-sector strategies to increase Dayton’s ability to be more immigrant friendly and implementing a framework encouraging both native-born and foreign-born participation.

 

Prior to joining the City of Dayton, Melissa gained national and international experience working on immigration issues. She lived and worked on the US-Mexico border where she researched human rights abuses and the immigration system. She also worked with the International Organization for Migration where she was part of a team that increased access to health care for Colombian refugees living in the northern border region of Ecuador.

 

Melissa has a Master of Social Work and Master of Public Health from New Mexico State University and was recently named a SPARK Fellow with Welcoming America.

 

 

Liz Dunbar

Executive Director,

Tacoma Community House

Liz Dunbar began as the Executive Director of Tacoma Community House in April 2009.  She retired in 2006 from the Department of Social and Health Services after 25 years of service. At DSHS, she served in a number of capacities, including State Refugee Coordinator, Diversity Director, Assistant Secretary for Economic Services and lastly as the Deputy Secretary of the department for six years.

 

Liz is active in community affairs as well, serving on the board of trustees for Tacoma Community College, the boards of the LASCO Foundation, Pioneer Human Services and the Japanese American Citizens League.  She is the daughter of a Japanese immigrant and a US Air Force officer.

 

Liz lives in Tacoma with her husband Mike, a financial planner and they have two grown children.

 


Rich Stolz

OneAmerica – Washington

Rich Stolz was born in Seoul, South Korea. His parents met in Korea, when his father, an American citizen, worked there in the construction field. His mother became a naturalized citizen, and Rich’s family moved to the United States when he was three. From an early age, Rich thought a good deal about what it meant to be a citizen, what it meant to be American, and the consequences of prejudice.

Over the last fifteen years, Rich has worked at the Center for Community Change, a national organization based in Washington, D.C.  Early in his tenure, he focused on the impact of welfare reform and immigration law changes enacted by Congress in the mid-1990s. Later, Rich helped to found and staff the Transportation Equity Network, a multi-ethnic organizing strategy focused on the impact of transportation policy on job access, community development, and environmental justice.

Eventually, Rich returned to immigration policy and organizing as the coordinator of the Fair Immigration Reform Movement (FIRM), a national coalition of immigrant rights organizations fighting for comprehensive immigration reform. He was later tapped to be the Campaign Manager for the Reform Immigration FOR America Campaign in 2008, a multi-million dollar, cross sector (labor, faith, community, business) campaign with more than 900 organizational endorsers.

Rich first cut his teeth in organizing while a student at Stanford University in California to create ethnic studies programs that would resource investment in research and instruction on Asian American, Chicano, African American and Native American Studies. In 1994, he served as a volunteer in efforts to defeat proposition 187, an anti-immigrant ballot measure in California. Throughout his life, he has been deeply influenced by the civil rights movement and liberation theology in the context of Catholic social teaching, including the centrality of faith, radical love, and human dignity. Together, these experiences affirmed his calling to social justice and human rights organizing and activism.

 

Ali Modarres

Professor & Director, Urban Studies Program

(Panel II Moderator)

Ali Modarres is the Director of Urban Studies at University of Washington Tacoma. He is the editor of Cities: The International Journal of Urban Policy and Planning and serves on a number of research and policy advisory boards. Dr. Modarres earned his Ph.D. in geography from the University of Arizona and holds master and bachelor degrees in landscape architecture from the same institution. He specializes in urban geography and his primary research and publication interests are socio-spatial urban dynamics and the political economy of urban design. He has published in the areas of immigration, race and ethnicity in American cities, social geography, transportation planning, environmental equity, urban development and public policy. Some of his recent articles have appeared in the Journal of Urban Affairs, Cities, International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, and Anthropology of the Middle East.